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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

20 Oct

Teenagers Are Quitting HS Sports Due to Body Image Concerns Driven by Social Media

More teens are quitting HS sports saying they don’t look right for the sports based on what they see in the media and social media, according to a new study.

19 Oct

COVID-19 Linked to Increased Risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, a Rare but Serious Autoimmune Disorder, New Study Finds

In a new study, participants recently infected with COVID-19 were six times more likely to develop Guillain-Barré syndrome, where the immune system attacks the nerves.

18 Oct

Adult ADHD Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

A new study finds adults with ADHD are nearly 3 times more likely to develop dementia compared to those without the condition.

Few Young Adults Could Administer Naloxone to Reverse Fentanyl Overdose

Few Young Adults Could Administer Naloxone to Reverse Fentanyl Overdose

Even though fentanyl-linked fatal overdoses are soaring among young adults, a new survey of American college students found that just 1 in 7 knew how to administer the overdose antidote drug naloxone.

Many who took the survey "reported high willingness to intervene during an overdose, yet only a small proportion knew how to administer nalo...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 22, 2024
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Pandemic Had Only Minor Effect on Young Kids' Development

Pandemic Had Only Minor Effect on Young Kids' Development

The pandemic caused only “modest” delays in developmental milestones for infants and toddlers, a new study has found.

Previous research has reported that pandemic-related lockdowns disrupted the lives of many people, including families with young children.

Day-to-day life was upended as schools and child care centers closed, many...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 22, 2024
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What Folks Consider 'Old Age' Is Getting Older

What Folks Consider 'Old Age' Is Getting Older

People’s idea of “old age” is aging itself, with middle-aged folks and seniors believing that old age starts later in life than did peers from decades ago, a new study finds.

The study revolves around the question “At what age would you describe someone as old?”

Decades ago, folks born in 1911 set the beginning of old age a...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 22, 2024
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A-Fib More Common in Middle-Aged Folk Than Thought

A-Fib More Common in Middle-Aged Folk Than Thought

The dangerous heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation is becoming more common in middle-aged people, a new study warns.

More than a quarter of patients at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) seeking care for A-Fib during the last decade were younger than 65, researchers found.

That’s much higher than the 2% ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 22, 2024
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U.S. Measles Cases Reach 125, Surpassing Recent Peak in 2022

U.S. Measles Cases Reach 125, Surpassing Recent Peak in 2022

Measles infections continue to spread across the country, with 125 cases now reported in 18 states, new U.S. government data shows.

That is more cases than were reported in all of 2022, the most recent annual peak for measles infections, the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday.

So far this ...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 22, 2024
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WHO Chief Sounds Alarm on Bird Flu Circulating in U.S. Cattle

WHO Chief Sounds Alarm on Bird Flu Circulating in U.S. Cattle

The H5N1 avian flu virus that's infecting U.S. cattle is increasingly showing up in mammals -- a dangerous sign that it could someday easily infect people.

That's the warning issued late last week by World Health Organization chief scientist Dr. Jeremy Farrar, CNN reported.

“We have to watch, more than watch, we have to m...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 22, 2024
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EPA Designates Two 'Forever Chemicals' as Hazardous

EPA Designates Two 'Forever Chemicals' as Hazardous

Two common PFAS "forever chemicals" have been deemed hazardous substances by the Environmental Protection Agency.

The new designation, enacted under the country's Superfund law, will let the EPA investigate and clean up leaks and spills of these harmful chemicals, agency officials said Friday.

It will also mean polluters can be char...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 22, 2024
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Many Parents Cook Special Meals for Little Picky Eaters: Poll

Many Parents Cook Special Meals for Little Picky Eaters: Poll

Parents too often wave the white flag when it comes to young picky eaters, a new survey finds.

Three out of five parents say they’re willing to play personal chef and cobble up a separate meal for a child who balks at the family dinner, according to a national poll from the University of Michigan.

This often leads to the kids munch...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 22, 2024
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Parents, Coaches: Help Young Athletes Avoid Summer Heat Hazards

Parents, Coaches: Help Young Athletes Avoid Summer Heat Hazards

Another broiling summer looms, along with another season of kids' summer sports.

It's a potentially harmful, even lethal combination. But experts at Nationwide Children's Hospital (NCH) have advice for kids, parents and coaches on how to keep young athletes safe when thermometers rise.

Each year, an estimated 240 people die from hea...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 20, 2024
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Hoping to Conceive? Experts Offer Tips to Better Female Fertility

Hoping to Conceive? Experts Offer Tips to Better Female Fertility

Women hoping to get pregnant sometimes wonder if there’s anything they can do to make it easier to conceive.

Those questions might take on an added edge if a couple has been having unprotected sex for at least a year with no success, according to the Mayo Clinic.

There are medical issues that affect the ability to become pregnant, ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Stigma, Shame Hit Many Gay Men Affected by Mpox Outbreak

Stigma, Shame Hit Many Gay Men Affected by Mpox Outbreak

A British study finds that beyond the physical pain and turmoil of an mpox diagnosis, many of the mostly gay and bisexual men infected during the 2022 outbreak faced stigma, homophobia and shame.

Mpox is spread largely through skin-to-skin contact, and the outbreak in Europe and the United States was largely localized to men who have sex ...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Calories, Not Meal Timing, Key to Weight Loss: Study

Calories, Not Meal Timing, Key to Weight Loss: Study

A head-to-head trial of obese, pre-diabetic people who ate the same amount of daily calories -- with one group following a fasting schedule and the other eating freely -- found no difference in weight loss or other health indicators.

So, despite the fact that fasting diets are all the rage, if you simply cut your daily caloric intake, weig...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Dietary Changes May Beat Meds in Treating IBS

Dietary Changes May Beat Meds in Treating IBS

The right diet may be the best medicine for easing the painful symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), new research shows.

In the study, two different eating plans beat standard medications in treating the debilitating symptoms of the gastrointestinal disease. One diet was low in “FODMAPs,” a group of sugars and carbohydrates foun...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Screen Pregnant Women for Syphilis, Ob-Gyn Group Advises

Screen Pregnant Women for Syphilis, Ob-Gyn Group Advises

All expecting mothers should get a blood test for syphilis three times during pregnancy, new guidance issued by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends.

The practice advisory calls on doctors to test for syphilis at a pregnant woman’s first prenatal care visit, then again during the third trimester and at birth...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Even With Weight Gain, Quitting Smoking in Pregnancy Still Best for Health

Even With Weight Gain, Quitting Smoking in Pregnancy Still Best for Health

Women who smoke and become pregnant may worry that the weight gain that comes with quitting might bring its own harms to themselves or their baby.

However, a new study confirms the health benefits of quitting smoking still far exceed any weight-linked concerns.

Weight gain can occur once women decide to forgo cigarettes, but even tha...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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A-Fib Is Strong Precursor to Heart Failure

A-Fib Is Strong Precursor to Heart Failure

The dangerous heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation is mainly known for increasing people’s risk of stroke.

But people with A-Fib actually have a much higher risk of developing heart failure than suffering a stroke, a new study shows.

In fact, the risk of heart failure associated with A-Fib is “twice as large as the ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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One Neurological Factor Keeps Black, Hispanic Patients From Alzheimer's Clinical Trials

One Neurological Factor Keeps Black, Hispanic Patients From Alzheimer's Clinical Trials

Black and Hispanic patients with Alzheimer’s disease are greatly underrepresented in clinical trials, even though they’re more likely to get dementia than whites.

However, racial discrimination may not be driving this disparity, a new study finds.

Instead, Black and Hispanic people are being judged ineligible for Alzheimer’s tr...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Managing Blood Sugar After Stroke Could Be Key to Outcomes

Managing Blood Sugar After Stroke Could Be Key to Outcomes

Managing a stroke victim’s blood sugar levels after they receive powerful clot-busting drugs might help them survive their health crisis, a new trial finds.

People with high blood sugar levels were more likely to suffer a potentially deadly brain bleed after clot-busters reopened their blocked brain arteries, researchers found.

The...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Dozens of COVID Virus Mutations Arose in Man With Longest Known Case

Dozens of COVID Virus Mutations Arose in Man With Longest Known Case

An immune-compromised man with a year-and-a-half-long COVID infection served as a breeding ground for dozens of coronavirus mutations, a new study discovered.

Worse, several of the mutations were in the COVID spike protein, indicating that the virus had attempted to evolve around current vaccines, researchers report.

“This case und...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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Blood Test Might Someday Diagnose Early MS

Blood Test Might Someday Diagnose Early MS

An early marker of multiple sclerosis could help doctors figure out who will eventually fall prey to the degenerative nerve disease, a new study says.

In one in 10 cases of MS, the body begins producing a distinctive set of antibodies in the blood years before symptoms start appearing, researchers reported April 19 in the journal Natur...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 19, 2024
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