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Results for search "Clinical Trials".

Health News Results - 112

Drug Combo May Be Safe, Effective Therapy for Rare Leukemia

A combination of two "targeted" therapies can beat back a rare form of blood cancer -- without the toxic effects of chemotherapy, a new study has found.

In a trial of 63 patients, researchers found that the drug regimen frequently wiped out all signs of the cancer -- a subtype of the blood cancer acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). And at 18 months, 95% of patients were still aliv...

Newer Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug May Help Ease Tough-to-Treat Cases

A recently approved rheumatoid arthritis medication appears to be an effective second-line therapy when biologic treatments start to fail, a new clinical trial reports.

Arthritis sufferers treated with upadacitinib had a significantly greater reduction in their symptoms and disease activity than people treated with a standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), said co-resea...

New Drug Could Extend Life for People With ALS

An experimental drug combination lengthens survival for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), new research shows.

A previous clinical trial found that the two-drug combo -- called AMX0035 -- slowed progression of the neurodegenerative disease over six months.

The new clinical trial of 137 patients with the disease, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, found that ...

Minimally Invasive Procedure May Free Type 2 Diabetics From Insulin

A small study suggests that a new procedure that treats part of the intestine just beyond the stomach may allow people with type 2 diabetes to safely stop taking insulin.

The procedure -- which resurfaces the duodenum -- was combined with a popular kind of diabetes medication called GLP-1 receptor agonists (such as Victoza, Trulicity, Ozempic) and counseling on lifestyle factors, such a...

Once-a-Week Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes Shows Promise in Early Trial

Type 2 diabetes can be tough to control without medication. But for some people, the thought of daily shots makes them delay or avoid starting insulin therapy.

Now, new research offers some hope for those insulin avoiders -- a once-a-week insulin injection may someday replace daily shots.

A phase 2 trial compared the new weekly insulin, called icodec, to the commonly used i...

Immunotherapy Drug Boosts Survival With Bladder Cancer

An immunotherapy drug significantly improved survival in patients with the most common type of bladder cancer, according to a new study.

About 550,000 new cases of bladder cancer are diagnosed worldwide each year, making it the 10th most common type of cancer, the study authors noted.

Chemotherapy is the initial standard of care for advanced bladder cancer. After chemotherap...

Could the MMR Vaccine Help Prevent COVID-19? New Trial May Tell

A new clinical trial will try to determine whether the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine can protect health care workers from being infected with COVID-19.

Hundreds of millions of people have received the MMR vaccine since it was developed nearly 50 years ago. It's usually given to children before age 6. Growing evidence suggests that the vaccine may also prevent COVID-19.

...

Experimental Drug Shows Promise Against ALS

An experimental treatment may help slow the progression of the deadly brain disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a new study finds.

Researchers called the results a promising step in the fight against a devastating and invariably fatal disease. And two advocacy groups are calling for swift action to make the drug available to patients.

ALS is also known as Lou Gehrig...

Multiple Studies Confirm Steroids Can Fight Severe COVID-19

A slew of "gold standard" clinical trials offer new hope for patients battling severe COVID-19: cheap, common drugs known as corticosteroids appear to cut the death rate by a third.

Publication of new data on treatment with corticosteroids such as hydrocortisone or dexamethasone "represents an important step forward in the treatment of patients with COVID-19," said Dr. Hallie Prescott...

Artificial Pancreas Controls Diabetes in Kids 6 and Up, Clinical Trial Shows

An artificial pancreas system is safe and effective at managing blood sugar levels in kids as young as age 6 with type 1 diabetes, according to a new study.

The system uses a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to track blood sugar levels and automatically delivers insulin when needed using an insulin pump. It replaces reliance on fingerstick or CGM with delivery of insulin by injection ...

Bee Healthy: Honey May Beat Cold Meds Against Cough

There may be no cure for the common cold, but a spoonful of honey might make it less miserable, a new research review concludes.

Parents have long used honey to soothe kids' sore throats and cough -- probably because their parents did. But the review of 14 clinical trials finds some science to back it up.

Overall, adults and kids given honey had less-severe, less-frequent co...

Hopeful News on Parkinson's: More Than 100 Trials Underway

While there are treatments to alleviate symptoms of Parkinson's disease, there is no known cure or preventive drug. But a recent review offers some encouraging findings.

The review found more than 100 clinical trials are underway around the world that are testing various preventive therapies and treatments for the neurodegenerative disorder.

The large number of trials, and ...

COVID-19 Clinical Trials Lack Diversity, Researchers Say

Although minorities are paying a disproportionate price in the rate of COVID-19 illnesses and deaths, they are underrepresented in clinical trials, a new study finds.

The researchers call upon the government, medical journals and funders of research to make sure trials include minorities so that the results can be extrapolated to the U.S. population.

In the Adaptive COVID-...

Bias More Likely in Medical Journals That Accept Reprint Fees: Study

There is a longstanding fear in the scientific community that pharmaceutical companies could sway the research published in medical journals by paying them for advertising, but a new study reveals that advertising might not be the problem.

"All the available literature suggests that ad revenue should be the real concern, but that's not what we found," said study author S. Scott Graham...

New Drug May Beat Older One at Preventing MS Relapse

A new injection drug can prevent multiple sclerosis flare-ups better than an existing medication, a clinical trial has found.

The drug, called ofatumumab, beat a standard MS medication in reducing patients' symptom relapses. It also slowed down the progression of their disability over six months.

The researchers said the findings, published Aug. 6 in the New England Journ...

In Rush to Publish, Most COVID-19 Research Isn't Reliable, Experts Say

The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted a massive scientific response to the crisis, with more than 1,500 coronavirus studies kicking off between March and mid-May of this year, a new study reports.

Unfortunately, much of this research has sown only confusion, producing precious little scientific evidence of sufficient quality to dramatically improve any understanding of COVID-19, research...

Skin Cream May Offer New Treatment Option for Psoriasis

A cream medication that eases skin inflammation might offer a safer treatment option for people with psoriasis, a new clinical trial suggests.

Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition that affects more than 8 million Americans, according to the National Psoriasis Foundation. The disease arises from an abnormal immune response that triggers rapid turnover of skin cells, causing them to pi...

What If a COVID-19 Vaccine Arrived and Many Americans Said No?

With several potential COVID-19 vaccines now in clinical trials, U.S. policymakers need to plan for the next hurdle: Ensuring Americans actually get vaccinated.

That's according to a new report from the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. It lays out recommendations for winning the public's trust of any future vaccine, and helping them access it as easily as possible.

...

Evidence Mounts That TB Vaccine Might Help Protect Against COVID-19

A tuberculosis vaccine may help reduce the risk of death from COVID-19, researchers suggest.

Developing countries have lower-than-expected COVID-19 death rates, and a TB vaccine given in countries with high rates of tuberculosis might play a significant role in reducing COVID-19 death rates, according to authors of a new study.

The vaccine, which is routinely given to childr...

Blacks Underrepresented in Cancer Drug Trials: Study

U.S. government-funded clinical trials for new cancer treatments have more Black participants than those run by drug companies, but Blacks are still underrepresented in cancer studies, researchers say.

The SWOG Cancer Research Network team analyzed data from 358 clinical trials -- 85 drug industry trials and 273 SWOG trials. They included nearly 94,000 patients who were being treated ...

Remdesivir May Reduce Deaths, Hasten Recovery for COVID-19 Patients

There's more good news on the effectiveness of the antiviral drug remdesivir against COVID-19, according to new clinical trial results from the drug's maker.

Gilead Sciences said Friday that in a trial involving more than 1,100 patients, remdesivir was associated with improved recovery and a 62% reduced risk of death compared with standard care.

The study also showed tha...

Antiviral Drugs Tied to Heart Issue in COVID-19 Patients

Older, critically ill COVID-19 patients who are given a combination of two common antiretroviral drugs can experience a drastic slowing of their heart rate, French researchers report.

In their study of 41 patients treated with lopinavir and ritonavir twice daily for 10 days, 22% developed a slow heart rate condition called bradycardia. When the drugs were stopped or doses lowered,...

75 or Older? Statins Can Still Benefit Your Heart

Older adults with healthy hearts probably would benefit from taking a cholesterol-lowering statin, a new study contends.

People 75 and older who were free of heart disease and prescribed a statin wound up with a 25% lower risk of death from any cause and a 20% lower risk of heart-related death, researchers reported July 7 in the Journal of the American Medical Association...

New Guidelines Could Double Number Eligible for Lung Cancer Screening

CT scans have been proven to help spot lung cancer early and save lives. Now, updated expert recommendations could double the number of Americans who are eligible for the yearly screening.

The recommendations -- from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) -- would expand the definition of "high risk" for lung cancer. That's expected to not only increase the number of people ...

Animal Tests Point to Possible Path to Ultrafast Insulin

An experimental ultrafast-acting insulin could work four times quicker than current fast-acting formulas, researchers say.

For the study, the researchers focused on a form of insulin called monomeric insulin. Though its structure should, in theory, allow it to act faster, monomeric insulin is too unstable for practical use, so the Stanford University team had to find a way around that...

Deep Brain Stimulation May Slow Parkinson's, Study Finds

Data from a five-year clinical trial is adding to growing evidence that deep brain stimulation (DBS) can slow the ravages of Parkinson's disease.

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., said that the therapy appears to curb any worsening of tremor and other symptoms, as well as lessening a patient's need for medications.

"Parkinson's is relen...

In Early Trial, an Ancient Drug Shows Promise Against Severe COVID-19

There's new evidence that a 2,000-year-old medicine might offer hope against a modern scourge: COVID-19.

The medication, called colchicine, is an anti-inflammatory taken as a pill. It's long been prescribed for gout, a form of arthritis, and its history goes back centuries. The drug was first sourced from the autumn crocus flower.

Doctors also sometimes use colchicine to tre...

Inhaled Remdesivir May Allow COVID-19 Patients to Be Treated at Home

An inhaled version of the antiviral drug remdesivir will soon be tested outside a hospital setting, Gilead Sciences announced Monday.

Remdesivir, which is made by Gilead, is now being used to treat COVID-19 patients worldwide. Currently, the drug has to be given intravenously through daily infusions in the hospital.

"An inhaled formulation would be given through a nebulizer...

Icky Prescription: Could Hookworms Help Ease MS?

In a new trial there are hints, but no proof, that a wriggling intestinal parasite might help fight multiple sclerosis.

The lowly hookworm has for years been proposed as a potential treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune disorders.

But the first clinical trial testing the potential benefits of the parasite against MS has produced decidedly mixed results, ...

Women Still Left Out of Much Medical Research

Your sex matters when it comes to your health, yet women may still be an afterthought in research studies.

Despite policies and grant requirements to include females in research studies, many researchers still don't analyze their data by sex, a new study found. If researchers don't look at their results by sex, it's impossible to know if diseases, drugs or vaccines might impact each ...

'Gold Standard' Clinical Trial Finds Hydroxychloroquine Won't Prevent COVID-19

Hydroxychloroquine, the malaria drug touted and reportedly used by President Donald Trump as a preventative for COVID-19, appears not to have lived up to its hype, a new study shows.

Unlike some prior studies, this new trial was a "gold standard" prospective, randomized clinical trial. It found that hydroxychloroquine could not prevent COVID-19 any better than a sugar pill.

...

Intensive Blood Pressure Control Reduces A-Fib Risk: Study

Intensive high blood pressure treatment may protect against a-fib, a heart rhythm disorder that can lead to stroke, heart attack and heart failure, researchers say.

They analyzed data from more than 8,000 high blood pressure patients who were at increased risk of heart disease and enrolled in a U.S. National Institutes of Health trial known as SPRINT.

Participants were on e...

Could Interferon Drugs Help Fight COVID-19?

In the race to find treatments for COVID-19, the antiviral drug remdesivir has gotten much of the attention. But researchers say a class of long-used drugs called interferons also looks promising.

Trials testing the medications are underway in several countries. A small study published last week in The Lancet found that a three-drug regimen, containing an interferon, helped hos...

Drug Combo Offers Hope Against Advanced Bladder Cancer

A combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy may slow the progress of metastatic bladder cancer and extend survival, a clinical trial suggests.

Current treatment for advanced bladder cancer is chemotherapy, but adding the immunotherapy drug atezolizumab (Tecentriq) appears to help more patients fight this disease. It strikes 81,000 Americans a year and kills 18,000.

"Th...

Healthy Vitamin D Levels Could Be Linked to COVID-19 Survival

There's been much speculation about whether vitamin D might prevent or help survival with COVID-19, and two new studies appear to underscore the link.

In the first study -- published in the journal Aging Clinical and Experimental Research -- British researchers found that COVID-19 infections and deaths were higher in countries where people had low vitamin D levels, such as Ita...

In Small Study, Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug Appears to Help COVID-19 Patients

In the scramble to find medicines that beat back COVID-19, researchers from Italy report encouraging results from a small study on a rheumatoid arthritis drug already in use.

The drug, anakinra, may help quiet the runaway immune response known as a "cytokine storm," which imperils some patients with severe COVID-19.

"Until a vaccine is available, we urgently need to find a w...

Fewer Kids in Cancer Trials, Which Might Not Be a Bad Thing

There's been a sharp decline in the number of U.S. children taking part in cancer clinical trials over the past few decades, but researchers say that might be good news.

Why? Having more effective treatments available now may be one reason for that decrease, they explained.

The researchers, from the University of Colorado Cancer Center, analyzed national data and found that ...

Researchers Move Toward Once-Yearly Treatment for HIV

Researchers have reformulated an HIV medication into a version they hope can eventually be taken as infrequently as once a year.

The work is only in the early stages, having been studied in lab animals. But the goal is to create an HIV drug that can be injected annually -- offering protection from infection or control of the virus in people who already have it.

The researche...

New Polio Vaccine Promising in Early Test

A new oral polio vaccine promises to help make polio a disease of the past, according to the results of a phase 1 clinical trial.

Polio was almost eliminated worldwide -- except in vaccine-induced cases. In those cases, the weakened virus used in vaccines developed the ability to escape from immunized individuals and spread in places with low vaccination rates.

The new des...

Lots of Drugs Are Being Tested Against COVID-19 -- But Will Any Work?

Dozens of drugs are being investigated for their value in treating COVID-19, as desperation drives doctors and researchers to look for something that could battle the virus and save lives.

"There are really no FDA-approved medications for the treatment of COVID-19, unfortunately," said Ashley Barlow, a pharmacy resident with the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore. "We'...

Could an Ancient Drug Help Fight Severe COVID-19?

As researchers hunt for ways to treat severe COVID-19 infections, a new trial will ask whether an old arthritis drug can prevent serious complications in the first place.

The medication, called colchicine, is an oral anti-inflammatory that has long been prescribed for gout, a form of arthritis. Its history goes back thousands of years, and the drug was first sourced from the autumn cr...

More Good News on Remdesivir's Power to Treat COVID-19

Preliminary data from two clinical trials using the antiviral drug remdesivir to treat COVID-19 patients is encouraging, researchers report.

One trial is providing the drug to patients with moderate illness and the other focuses on patients with severe illness.

A number of the patients are now recovering and have been released from the hospital. While it's too early to tell...

Clinical Trial to Investigate Nitric Oxide Treatment of COVID-19

Doctors at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) are enrolling patients in an international clinical trial to find out if inhaled nitric oxide benefits those with COVID-19 who have severely damaged lungs.

Right now, there are no approved treatments for the illness caused by the new coronavirus. A severe form of lung failure called acute respiratory distress syndrome is the lea...

Magnetic Brain 'Zap' Shows Promise Against Severe Depression

Intensifying a standard form of brain stimulation may bring relief to people with hard-to-treat depression, a preliminary study suggests.

The study involved just 21 patients, but the treatment sent 90% into remission within a few days. That's a success rate that has never been seen in early testing of other therapies for severe depression, the researchers said.

The thera...

Trials Begin for Potential COVID-19 Drug Remdesivir

A drug originally developed to treat Ebola is getting a second chance in the spotlight, as research teams in the United States, Asia and Europe race to test it against the new coronavirus.

The drug, called remdesivir, has already been given to a limited number of patients hospitalized with COVID-19, on a "compassionate use" basis. That included the first U.S. patient diagnosed with th...

How One Patient's Battle With COVID-19 Changed U.S. Testing Protocols

The first community-acquired case of COVID-19 in the United States posed many questions for doctors, but the answers they found led to key changes in federal guidelines for coronavirus testing, according to a case study.

The patient was an otherwise healthy woman in her 40s who was admitted to University of California (UC) Davis Health with a respiratory infection. Doctors suspected c...

Daily Aspirin Won't Stop Dementia, Study Finds

Millions of Americans pop a low-dose aspirin each day to help ward off heart issues, but a new study finds that protection may not extend to dementia.

Although the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin have been touted as protection against thinking and memory (or "cognitive") problems from Alzheimer's and other dementias, a large, randomized trial suggests aspirin won't slow mental de...

Racial Bias Persists in Clinical Trial Recruitment

Racial bias and stereotyping are common when researchers are recruiting people for cancer clinical trials, a new study finds.

"Examples of the stereotypes we observed included perceptions that African Americans were less knowledgeable about cancer research studies, less likely to participate due to altruism, or simply less likely to complete all facets of the research study," said stu...

It's Tough for Clinical Trial Participants to Learn Results

Most clinical trial participants are not told the results of their study -- even though most people want to know, and researchers want to tell them.

The reason: Communication is a big barrier, a new study says. Simply put, researchers and subjects may not speak the same language.

Teaching researchers to make their findings understandable to the lay person could make trial p...

New Weapon in Fight Against Multidrug-Resistant TB

While the world's focus is trained on the new coronavirus, a groundbreaking clinical trial finds researchers battling a tough-to-treat form of an "old" infectious disease, tuberculosis.

TB is a bacterial infection that usually attacks the lungs. The disease does not get much attention in wealthy nations, where it's less common. The United States saw about 9,000 cases in 2018, accordin...