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Results for search "Safety &, Public Health".

02 Mar

Is Your Purse A Danger Zone To Kids?

5 common products parents carry that can potentially harm children.

Health News Results - 699

COVID Pandemic Shortened U.S. Life Expectancy by More Than a Year

The COVID-19 pandemic significantly shortened life expectancy in the United States, especially among Black people and Hispanics, a new study says.

With more than 336,000 COVID-19 deaths nationwide last year, researchers decided to examine the pandemic's impact on life expectancy.

The projection: Due to pandemic deaths, life expectancy at birth for Americans will shrink by 1.13 years...

Pharmacy Chains Ready to Supply COVID-19 Vaccines to Americans


Now that federal guidelines have expanded COVID-19 vaccine eligibility to include people over 65 and those of all ages with underlying health conditions, drug stores say they are ready, willing and able to start giving the shots.

There's just one slight glitch: supply. But with two vaccines already available and others moving toward emergency use authorizati...

3 Steps Could Nearly Eliminate COVID Infections on College Campuses: Study

A combination of mask use, social distancing and routine testing would eliminate nearly all COVID-19 infections on U.S. college campuses, a new study claims.

Using a computer model that simulated a semester of a mid-sized college (5,000 students and 1,000 faculty), researchers assessed the effectiveness and cost of 24 combinations of four common preventive strategies: social distancing; m...

What Happened to the Flu This Year?

The United States has far fewer flu cases than normal, and experts say it's probably due to measures people are taking to protect themselves from COVID-19.

Flu season usually peaks between December and February. Influenza typically causes about 45 million illnesses, 810,000 hospitalizations and 61,000 deaths in the United States each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control...

Shorter COVID Quarantine for College Athletes a Good Idea, Study Finds

After SARS-CoV-2 exposure, a 14-day quarantine is standard among university athletes. But shorter quarantines for these athletes, along with mid-quarantine testing, may improve their compliance without increasing the risk that they'll infect others, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from 620 U.S. college athletes who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 while in quarantine after e...

I've Already Had COVID-19, Do I Need the Vaccine?

Folks who've gotten through a COVID-19 infection might naturally question whether they need to get a coronavirus vaccination when their turn comes.

Experts say they really need the shot anyway, because even after having COVID they might be vulnerable to reinfection.

"We're encouraging people if they meet the other criteria to get immunized because we don't know how long either natur...

Even 1 Drink a Day May Raise Your Odds for A-Fib


Moderate drinking is often touted as heart-healthy, but a large new study finds that even one drink a day might raise the risk of an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation.

Atrial fibrillation, or a-fib, is a common heart arrhythmia where the upper chambers of the heart quiver chaotically, causing a fast and irregular heartbeat. It's not immediatel...

Lockdowns' Benefits for Air Quality Weren't as Big as Thought: Study

Two types of air pollution declined in cities around the world during initial COVID-19 lockdowns, but one type increased, a new study finds.

Researchers assessed changes in levels of nitrogen dioxide, ozone and fine particulate (PM2.5) air pollution during lockdowns in 11 cities: Beijing and Wuhan in China; Milan; Rome; Madrid; London; Paris; Berlin; New York; Los Angeles; and Delhi, Indi...

Pandemic Is Tied to Big Rise in U.S. Heart Deaths

In a finding that highlights another health consequence of the coronavirus pandemic, researchers report that the risk of dying from heart disease increased during the coronavirus lockdowns last spring, likely because people were too scared to go to the hospital.

But the dangers of not seeking treatment for a medical emergency far outweigh that of catching COVID-19, especially now that pre...

Allergists' Group Offers Guidelines on COVID-19 Vaccines

A task force of allergists and immunologists recommends those administering the COVID-19 vaccine ask patients some key questions beforehand.

While reactions to vaccines are extremely rare, the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) said anyone being vaccinated should be asked if they have a history of a severe allergic reaction ...

Biden Says He Will Release All Vaccine Doses After Taking Office

President-elect Joe Biden plans to release nearly all available doses of COVID-19 vaccine when he takes office, reversing the Trump administration's strategy of holding back half the supply to ensure second doses are available.

The potentially risky move is meant to boost a nationwide COVID-19 vaccination program that has gotten off to a slow start, with only about 5.9 million doses admin...

Survey Shows Mental Woes Spiked in U.S. Pandemic's First Months

It may be no surprise that the COVID-19 pandemic is causing some Americans significant psychological distress. That mental trauma hit people hard, even early in the pandemic, new research shows.

A new RAND Corporation study reports that more than 10% of Americans surveyed said they experienced psychological distress during April and May of 2020 -- the same number as in all of 201...

Global Warming May Be Triggering Toxic Algae Blooms Along U.S. West Coast

New toxic algal blooms have appeared on the U.S. west coast due to an ocean heat wave, a new study finds.

The researchers said that climate change is increasing the frequency of highly toxic algal blooms in this area.

These algae produce a neurotoxin called domoic acid that causes severe and potentially lethal digestive and neurological symptoms, and is a threat to marine wildlife a...

How to Sleep Better in 2021

If you're like most American adults, you're not getting enough sleep.

This could be the year to change that, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), which recommends adults get at least seven hours of sleep each night. A survey conducted in July showed that 85% of adults in the United States get less.

"Our survey findings show a worrying trend of national sleep d...

With Pot Rules Relaxed, More U.S. Teens Driving While High: Study

America's roads are notoriously unsafe on New Year's Eve, and a new study shows that marijuana legalization could be making the situation even worse.

Almost half of teenagers who regularly use pot admit they've gotten behind the wheel while stoned, a new study in JAMA Network Open reveals.

Overall, twice as many teens report driving under the influence of marijuana tha...

Masks Do Make Faces Harder to Recognize, Study Shows

A new study confirms what you likely already know from experience -- it can be hard to recognize people when they're wearing masks during the COVID-19 pandemic.

"For those of you who don't always recognize a friend or acquaintance wearing a mask, you are not alone," said researchers Tzvi Ganel and Erez Freud.

"Faces are among the most informative and significant visual stimuli in hu...

Masks Don't Mask Others' Emotions for Kids

Children can still read the emotional expressions of people wearing masks during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers say.

"We now have this situation where adults and kids have to interact all the time with people whose faces are partly covered, and a lot of adults are wondering if that's going to be a problem for children's emotional development," said study co-author Ashley Ruba, a postd...

How to Stay Safe From Falls, Freezing This Winter

Outdoor activities can help you keep fit this winter while staying safe from COVID-19, but you need to take precautions to reduce your risk of injury, an expert says.

Skiing and snowboarding are good examples. Falls are common in these sports, but proper technique and safety gear can reduce the risk of injury.

Each year, nearly 120,000 ski- and snowboard-related injuries are treated...

Caring for Elderly Loved Ones During a Holiday Lockdown

While everyone is dealing with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, older adults may feel the loss of holiday traditions the most.

It is possible to make this season feel joyful, even with all the changes. It's also a good time to check on their health and boost their mood, even from afar.

"As much as you love the older adults in your life, now is not the time to gather with them, e...

Hurricanes Leave Rise in Hospitalizations in Their Wake

Hospitals are swamped with older patients after hurricanes, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on hospitalizations for adults 65 and older in the month following eight of the United States' largest hurricanes in recent years.

In this age group, post-hurricane increases in hospitalizations for any reason ranged from 10% (Hurricane Irene, 2011) to 23% (Hurricane Sandy, 2012)...

How to Guard Against Home Heating Hazards

Many Americans are working at home or attending school virtually during the COVID-19 pandemic, leading to increased use of home heating and its potential risks, an expert says.

Heating sources can pose electrical hazards and fire dangers, noted Purnima Unni, manager of the pediatric trauma injury prevention program at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt University in Nashv...

Schools, Day Care Not a Big Factor in Kids Getting COVID: Study

As a rule, COVID-19 spreads rapidly in most groups, but new research suggests that schools and day care centers appear to be the exception.

Among those under 18, the virus is easily spread by close contact with family members who have COVID-19 and at gatherings where people don't wear masks, but going to school wasn't linked to positive COVID-19 tests, according to the researchers.

...

Narrow Hallways Ideal for Coronavirus Spread: Study

You might want to think twice before you enter a hallway with strangers during the pandemic: Researchers report that following a fast-walking person with COVID-19 down a narrow corridor could increase your risk of infection, even if you keep your distance.

That's because that person can leave long streams of virus-laden droplets behind them, according to a study published Dec. 15 in th...

USPS Cuts Could Pose Harm If Mail-Order Meds Delayed: Study

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 16, 2020 (HealthDay)-- Delayed mail delivery due to a push from the White House and others to slash spending and services could have enormous consequences for Americans who depend on the U.S. Postal Service for access to urgently needed prescription medications, a new study warns.

"We found that among those who rely exclusively on mail-order pharmacies, about half are elde...

Loneliness Continues to Rise for Americans Under Lockdown

Loneliness, particularly among folks under shelter-in-place orders, is a growing issue for Americans during the coronavirus pandemic, new research finds.

More people report they are feeling lonely, depressed and even harboring thoughts of suicide as COVID-19 cases in the United States soar. And those who are chafing under lockdown or other stay-at-home restrictions appear to be at the gre...

Allergists' Group Offers Advice on Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine

Americans may have questions about possible allergic reactions as immunization with the first COVID-19 vaccine begins, and allergy experts can provide some answers.

The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine received emergency use authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday, and distribution of the vaccine began on Monday. But on Dec. 9, soon after the rollout of the vaccine in t...

Why COVID Lies on Social Media Are So Seductive


Nearly all cases of COVID-19 are completely harmless. Masks deprive people of oxygen. COVID-19 is a hoax, dreamed up by politicians to control your life.

None of these statements is true, and yet every one has spread like wildfire through social media at one point or another this year.

That's because such misinformation exploits specific vulnerabilities in people's ability to th...

Avoid Allergy Flare-Ups This Holiday Season

Doctors are warning about the threat of COVID-19 transmission as cold weather forces people indoors. But indoor allergies could also take the joy out of your holiday season, an expert says.

Dust, mold, pets, furniture and houseplants can cause indoor allergies, said Dr. David Corry. He's a professor of medicine in the section of immunology, allergy and rheumatology at Baylor College of Me...

If You Already Had COVID, Do You Need the COVID Vaccine?

More than 15 million Americans have been infected by the COVID-19 virus, and many may be questioning whether they need to receive one of the two coronavirus vaccines now on the verge of approval from U.S. regulators.

Short answer: Yes.

"They will be asked to stand in line and get a vaccine also," said Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University...

329 Americans Are Injured by Guns Every Day: Study

Firearm injury is a major health crisis in the United States and new research sheds more light on how many of those who are injured survive and the circumstances of their shootings.

For the study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia University analyzed nationwide data from death certificates and emergency room visits.

Between 2009 and 2017, the United States...

Saliva Equals Nasal Swab for COVID Test Accuracy

A self-collected saliva sample is as good at detecting COVID-19 as a nasal swab administered by a health care worker -- without exposing medical staff to the virus while collecting the sample.

"The current pandemic has placed a significant strain on the supply chain, from swabs to the personal protective equipment [PPE] health care workers need to safely collect samples," explained lead i...

High-Dose Flu Shot No Better for Heart Patients

Getting a high-dose flu shot instead of a regular dose doesn't further reduce the risk of serious flu-complications, hospitalization or death in people with heart disease, new research shows.

The findings don't change established guidelines. Heart disease patients and other people with chronic illnesses do benefit from flu shots and should get one every year, according to the authors...

Scientists Test Safest Way Driver, Passengers Can Avoid COVID Spread

Traveling in a car with another person during the pandemic? Certain key steps might cut the odds of coronavirus spread during the trip, researchers say.

One big move that helps: Drive with all four windows down and have the passenger sit in the rear seat on the opposite side from the driver, the new study found.

This helps create "an air flow pattern that travels across the cabin, ...

How Safe Are the New COVID Vaccines?

Two COVID-19 vaccines are on the verge of approval in the United States, with pharmaceutical companies promising that millions of doses will be available to the first wave of recipients within a matter of weeks.

Creating two vaccines in less than a year is an astonishing achievement, experts say, but the next task could prove even more difficult — convincing Americans that it's safe to ...

Youth Vaping Rates Have Plunged During Lockdown: Study

Vaping among teens and young adults has decreased dramatically during the COVID-19 pandemic, with two-thirds of e-cigarette users reporting that they've either cut back or quit, a new study says.

About 32% of e-cigarette users said they quit this year and another 35% reported cutting back, according to survey results published Dec. 3 in JAMA Network Online.

Concerns about l...

Football-Loving States Drop The Ball on Concussion: Study

States with strong football cultures have often fumbled measures to protect young players who've suffered concussions, researchers say.

They analyzed youth concussion laws introduced by states between 2007 and 2014, specifically guidelines requiring a 24-hour delay before sending a player with a possible concussion back onto the field.

The researchers found that states with college ...

Pandemic Is Devastating Low-Income Black Households

Low-income Black Americans had more job losses, more difficulty getting food and medicine, and higher levels of debt in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic than their white or Hispanic peers, a new study finds.

"Media coverage has focused on the racially disparate effects of COVID-19 as a disease, but we were interested in the socioeconomic effects of the virus, and whether it track...

Should Cancer Survivors Be Prioritized for COVID Vaccine?

Cancer survivors have higher odds of dying from seasonal flu, suggesting they may also be at increased risk from COVID-19 and may need to be among the first in line for vaccination against both diseases.

Researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine analyzed medical data from more than 630,000 people in the United Kingdom between 1990 and 2014, including more than 10...

Some Talc Products Contain Asbestos: Study

Nearly 15% of talc-based cosmetic products analyzed in a recent study contained asbestos.

Environmental Working Group (EWG) -- an American advocacy nonprofit that commissioned the tests and did the analysis -- said methods used by the cosmetics industry to screen talc supplies are inadequate. The voluntary testing method developed by industry is not sensitive enough to screen for asbestos...

Wood-Fired Cooking a Cause of Lung Illness in Developing World

People who cook with wood instead of other fuels may be at risk of lung damage because of the pollutants and bacterial toxins they're breathing, a small study suggests.

Researchers studied the impact of cookstove pollutants on 23 people in Thanjavur, India, who use liquefied petroleum gas or wood biomass (wood, crop waste or wood brush) to cook.

They measured concentrations of pollu...

COVID Cases Could Double by Biden's Inauguration: Study

The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the United States is likely to nearly double before President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration, researchers warn.

Cases could rise from 11.4 million to 20 million by the end of January, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the journal Scientific Reports. Of course, counts vary day to day -- as of Tuesday, for example, there were 12.4 m...

Poll: 1 in 3 Parents Pick Holiday Gathering Over COVID Safety

As COVID-19 cases surge throughout the United States and the holiday season kicks off with Thanksgiving on Thursday, families are faced with a challenging choice.

Do they skip family gatherings and the usual way they celebrate their traditions? Or do they risk bringing the novel coronavirus to their extended family of loved ones?

In a new nationwide poll of 1,443 parents, about one ...

Parents' Age Key to Whether Kids Get Vaccinated Against COVID, Study Finds

As scientists worked on COVID-19 vaccines, other researchers were addressing a question: Once shots are available, will parents vaccinate their kids against the new coronavirus?

The answer: Younger parents are much less likely than older ones to plan to vaccinate their children and themselves against COVID-19.

"Parents' willingness to vaccinate themselves and their children against ...

College Kid Coming Home for Thanksgiving? Here's How to Keep Your Family Safe

As college students prepare to leave their campuses for Thanksgiving or study remotely for the rest of the semester, families should consider their risks and work to reduce them, according to an infectious disease expert.

Dr. David Cennimo, an assistant professor in pediatric infectious disease at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, offered suggestions on how families could appro...

Will Biden 'De-Politicize' COVID?

President-elect Joe Biden campaigned on big plans for health care, many of which would face an uphill road if the U.S. Senate remains in Republican hands.

But one of the first contributions Biden will make to America's health also will be one of the most important, experts said -- de-politicizing and unifying the U.S. response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

"I think you have in this pers...

Stay Home This Holiday, CDC and Medical Groups Urge

Americans should stay home and avoid big Thanksgiving gatherings, leading public health agencies and medical societies warn as COVID-19 surges and pandemic deaths in the United States pass 250,000.

At a press conference held Thursday, officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advised people to limit celebrations to only those who've been living in the household for ...

COVID in Pregnancy Won't Affect Obstetric Outcomes: Study

Pregnant women with COVID-19 have little risk of developing severe symptoms, as do their newborns, a new study finds.

In fact, 95% of these women have good outcomes, and just 3% of their babies test positive for COVID-19, researchers say.

"For 5% of COVID-19-positive pregnant women, however -- those who get very sick -- the risks to both mother and baby are significant," said study ...

With Cold Weather Forcing Patrons Inside, How Safe Are Restaurants?

Restaurants are under increasing pressure to provide a safe dining environment as winter approaches and the United States enters what could be the worst wave yet of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Some eateries are attempting to extend outdoor dining into the colder winter months, setting up heated tents that might allow patrons to enjoy a meal without fear of contracting the coronavirus. Others a...

Got Leftover Meds? Ditch Them at Pharmacy Drop Boxes

Medication drop boxes at pharmacies are a safe and secure way for people to dispose of unwanted drugs, but many people are unaware of them, a new study finds.

Medications placed in the drop boxes are collected and typically incinerated or disposed of as hazardous waste.

That avoids them being flushed down the toilet or thrown in the trash, where they pollute groundwater, rivers and ...

Thin Ice: Global Warming May Be Raising Drowning Risks

More children and young adults are drowning in winter lakes because of warming temperatures that create unstable lake ice, a new study finds.

A team of international researchers examined several decades of data, including 4,000 drownings and population information from throughout Canada, 14 U.S. states, Estonia, Germany, Latvia, Finland, Russia, Sweden and regions of Italy and Japan. They...

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