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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: High Blood Pressure".

Health News Results - 252

AHA News: People With Depression Fare Worse in Heart Health Study

Heart disease and depression are interwoven, and a new study is helping unravel that connection by linking depression with poorer scores on seven important measures of heart health.

The research included more than 4,000 people taking part in a national survey who had been screened for depression using a basic questionnaire. Participants were evaluated for weight, smoking, diet, physical a...

Prescription-Strength Fish Oil Won't Help Your Heart -- Or Will It?

Does high-strength fish oil help the heart or doesn't it?

Prior research into a prescription medicine derived from fish called Vascepa, announced earlier this year, suggested it might be of real value for heart patients.

But the results from a trial of another such drug called Epanova, released Sunday, are disappointing: Researchers found no benefit from taking the medicine for a w...

Transgender People Often Have Heart Risks: Study

Many transgender people who take hormone therapy have unaddressed risks for heart disease and stroke, a new study finds.

These patients often have undiagnosed high blood pressure and high cholesterol, even in young adulthood, researchers found.

"Previous research has shown that transgender individuals are less likely to have access to health care or to utilize health care for a vari...

Green Spaces Do a Heart Good

More green space can reduce air pollution, improve air quality and maybe lower the risk for heart disease deaths, a new study suggests.

"We found that both increased greenness and increased air quality were associated with fewer deaths from heart disease," said researcher Dr. William Aitken, a cardiology fellow with the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Greenness is a m...

After Heart Attack, Pot Smoking Raises Post-Op Dangers

Election Day 2020 saw marijuana legalization continue its march across the United States, but a pair of new studies warn that smoking pot could increase risk for heart patients.

Marijuana smokers are more likely to suffer complications like excess bleeding or stroke if they undergo angioplasty to reopen clogged arteries, a University of Michigan-led study found.

Pot smokers who've h...

Flu Vaccine Rates Low in Young Adults With Heart Disease

Among young adults with heart disease, less than 25% get a flu shot, a new study finds.

"Individuals with cardiovascular disease are more likely to have flu than among those without any chronic health conditions," said researcher Dr. Tarang Parekh, a Ph.D. candidate and assistant researcher at George Mason University College of Health and Human Services in Fairfax, Va.

Getting the ...

Beware of Blood Pressure Changes at Night

If your blood pressure changes a lot overnight -- either rising or falling -- you may have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke, a new study from Japan reports.

When systolic blood pressure (the top number) jumps up by 20 mm/Hg or more during the night, the risk of heart disease and stroke goes up by 18% and the risk of heart failure increases by 25%.

If people consistently...

Five Ways to Reduce Your Stroke Risk

Strokes can happen any time, anywhere and at any age, which is why it's important to know how to reduce your risk, says the American Stroke Association.

First, check your blood pressure regularly.

"Checking your blood pressure regularly and getting it to a healthy range is one of the most important things you can do to reduce your risk of stroke," Dr. Mitchell Elkind, president of t...

Heart Conditions Could Raise Risk of Torn Aorta During Pregnancy

Pregnancy can increase the risk of a rare, dangerous heart condition called aortic dissection, researchers report.

This is especially true for women with underlying heart conditions that can go undetected.

Aortic dissections -- which affect 3 in 100,000 people per year -- cause the layers of the aorta to tear, and blood to pool or leak instead of flow normally. Patients requ...

'Heat Not Burn' Cigarettes Can Still Harm the Heart

"Heat-not-burn" tobacco products, created as an alternative to other types of smoking, may harm the user's heart, researchers report.

These tobacco products -- think IQOS from Philip Morris -- are billed as substitutes for e-cigarettes or traditional smokes. But a new review finds they may be tied to heart and blood vessel harms.

Researchers found the inhalants were linked ...

Having Heart Disease Can Make Other Surgeries More Risky

Heart patients may face a greater chance of cardiovascular complications after having major surgery that doesn't involve the heart, new research suggests.

Twenty percent of these patients experienced heart troubles within a year of such surgery, the researchers found.

"Our study reveals a greater likelihood of having heart problems or dying after noncardiac surgery than has ...

Arm Squeezes With Blood Pressure Cuffs Might Aid Recovery After Stroke

After administering clot-busting drugs to treat a stroke, using blood pressure cuffs to squeeze each arm might aid recovery, a new, small Chinese study suggests.

In the technique -- called remote ischemic post-conditioning -- the flow of oxygen-rich blood is repeatedly interrupted and restored using blood pressure cuffs on the arms. Earlier studies have found that the technique may p...

Heart Patients Need to Be Wary of Coronavirus

The coronavirus pandemic and flu season pose a double risk for heart disease patients, so they need to be extra vigilant about their health, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) says.

"Heart disease patients bear a greater burden during the pandemic since they are having to navigate managing their heart health while also protecting themselves from COVID-19, as they are at increase...

Tough Menopause May Signal Future Heart Woes

As if the misery of hot flashes, night sweats and sleep troubles weren't enough, now new research suggests that women who routinely experience moderate to severe menopausal symptoms have a higher risk of stroke and heart disease.

"This analysis assessed various menopausal symptoms and their association with health outcomes. Women with two or more moderate to severe menopausal symptom...

Diabetes During Pregnancy Could Raise Lifelong Heart Risks for Children

The foundation for early heart disease might begin not during childhood or in the years that follow, but in the womb.

Researchers studying nearly 30 years of data from families in Manitoba, Canada, found a strong connection between heart disease risk factors in teens and young adults and their mother's type 2 or gestational diabetes.

"I was surprised at the strength of the a...

Kids Who Need Steroids Face Risk of Diabetes, Other Ills

Children who need to take oral steroids for chronic or life-threatening conditions can experience serious side effects, according to new research.

Children with autoimmune disorders such as juvenile arthritis, psoriasis or inflammatory bowel disease are often prescribed a steroid to keep the illness under control.

But the odds that a child might develop diabetes was nearly s...

Blood Pressure Meds Can Affect COVID-19 Care

People with high blood pressure tend to fare worse when infected with COVID-19, and the chronic condition can complicate their treatment in unexpected ways, new research shows.

For example, some COVID-19 patients must be taken off their blood pressure medications if their blood pressure falls to dangerously low levels, a condition called hypotension. Otherwise, they'll risk dying or d...

Do Fatter Legs Mean Lower Blood Pressure?

People with fatter legs appear less likely to have high blood pressure, new research suggests.

The researchers suspect that measuring leg fat could help guide blood pressure prevention efforts. Those with bigger legs may not need to worry as much about high blood pressure -- a contributor to heart attack and stroke.

"Distribution of fat matters. Even though we think that f...

More Than 1 Drink a Day Ups Blood Pressure for Diabetics

It's probably a good idea to skip that second glass of wine if you have diabetes, because new research suggests that having more than one drink daily raises your risk of high blood pressure.

People with type 2 diabetes who had eight or more drinks a week (moderate drinkers) had more than 60% higher odds of having high blood pressure, according to the study. They also tended to ha...

No Link Found Between Blood Pressure Meds and Cancer: Study

Blood pressure drugs don't increase the risk of cancer, according to the largest study to examine the issue.

A possible link between blood pressure drugs and cancer has been the subject of debate for decades, but evidence has been inconsistent and conflicting.

For this study, researchers analyzed data from 31 clinical trials of blood pressure drugs that involved 260,000 peop...

Remote Monitoring May Help Control High Blood Pressure

Telemedicine might help people with stubbornly high blood pressure get their numbers down -- and possibly lower their risk of heart disease and stroke in the long run, a new study suggests.

Doctors already recommend that people with high blood pressure use a home monitor to track their numbers. But research suggests that home readings, alone, only make a small difference in getting th...

Some Vegetarian Diets Are Much Healthier Than Others

For a host of reasons, millions worldwide are deciding to give up meat and focus on a plant-based diet.

But new research out of Greece is a reminder that not all vegetarian diets are healthy -- especially for people who are already obese.

"The quality of plant-based diets varies," concluded a team led by Matina Kouvari of Harokopio University in Athens.

Reporting T...

Blood Pressure Meds Could Improve Survival in COVID-19 Patients

In the largest such study yet, researchers have found that two classes of common blood pressure medications seem tied to better survival against COVID-19.

The U.K. findings should allay any worry that the two types of mediations -- angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) -- might actually harm COVID-19 patients.

"We k...

What Athletes Should Know About COVID-19, Heart Damage and Working Out

With evidence mounting that COVID-19 can damage the heart, experts urge people to take precautions when doing vigorous exercise.

Up to 30% of patients hospitalized with coronavirus infection have signs of cardiac injury, according to Dr. Sunal Makadia, health director of sports cardiology at LifeBridge Health in Baltimore.

The prevalence of heart damage in milder cases o...

Marijuana Is Not Heart-Healthy, Experts Say

As marijuana use becomes more common, could heart troubles follow?

Yes, warns a new statement from the American Heart Association (AHA).

A full understanding of how marijuana affects the heart and blood vessels remains limited by a lack of adequate research, but some chemicals in cannabis -- particularly THC, the chemical behind marijuana's "high" -- have been linked to an i...

The Fitter Do Better After an A-Fib Treatment

Physically fit patients with the irregular heartbeat atrial fibrillation (AF) are most likely to benefit from ablation, a new study finds.

Patients who are less fit are hospitalized more often, continue to use anti-arrhythmic drugs longer and have higher death rates, researchers say.

"AF does not occur in a vacuum but rather represents one manifestation of the impact of po...

Nearly a Third of Young Black Americans Have High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is often seen as a condition of old age, but a new study finds that it's common among young Americans -- especially young Black adults.

The study, of 18- to 44-year-olds in the United States, found that high blood pressure was prevalent across all racial groups: Among both white and Mexican American participants, 22% had the condition.

But young Black...

AHA News: Sustained High Blood Pressure May Damage Brain Vessels

Having high blood pressure for long periods may increase the chance of small vessel damage in the brain, which has been linked to dementia and stroke, according to a new study.

Scientists have long known high blood pressure, also called hypertension, can lead to stroke, and past studies also have connected it to Alzheimer's disease. The new research, published Friday in the American Hea...

What Puts You at High Risk of Midlife Mental Decline?

Your thinking skills may be at risk of declining in midlife if you smoke or have high blood pressure or diabetes, a new study suggests.

Heart disease risk factors -- especially high blood pressure and diabetes -- have become more common in midlife, the study authors noted.

"We found those two risk factors, as well as smoking, are associated with higher odds of having accel...

Even in Dirty Air, Working Out Can Help Cut Risk of High Blood Pressure

Regular exercise can reduce your risk of high blood pressure, even if you live in an area with high levels of air pollution, new research shows.

The new study included more than 140,000 adults in Taiwan who did not have high blood pressure and who were followed for an average of five years.

The researchers found that those who were highly active and exposed to low levels of ...

Beta Blocker Heart Meds Might Pose Special Risks for Women

Millions of Americans are prescribed blood pressure medicines called beta blockers, especially after a heart attack. But a new Italian study finds that these go-to drugs might not work as well for women as they do for men.

"What we found presents a solid case for reexamination of the use of beta blocker therapy for women with hypertension," said study lead author Dr. Raffaele Bugiardi...

AHA News: High Blood Pressure Increasingly Deadly for Black People

Cardiovascular deaths related to high blood pressure, often called a silent killer, continued to rise over the last two decades, according to new research, which showed stark health inequities.

Black people had a nearly twofold higher mortality rate than their white peers for hypertension-related heart disease deaths in 2018, according to the study. That year, the death rate for Black m...

Trauma of Racism Fuels High Blood Pressure Among Black Americans: Study

Cardiologist Dr. Willie Lawrence remains haunted by the memory of police shooting his best friend during a 1966 race riot in Cleveland.

"I saw my best friend shot in the back and the leg by police. I saw his sister shot five times. I witnessed all that, and that impacted me for the rest of my life," said Lawrence, chief of cardiology at HCA Midwest Health's Research Medical Center in ...

Exercise Might Make Breast Milk's Goodness Even Better

Exercise is part of a healthy lifestyle, but a new study suggests it also increases the amount of a beneficial compound called 3SL in the breast milk of both humans and mice.

Based on that, researchers think that its benefits to babies could last for decades, potentially making them less likely to experience such chronic illnesses as obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease as they ...

Preterm Birth Ups Mom's Long-Term Heart Disease Risk: Study

Over a lifetime, women who've had a preterm delivery have a higher risk of heart disease, new research suggests.

The findings point to the fact that doctors should include a woman's reproductive history in assessments of heart disease risk, according to the researchers.

"Preterm delivery should now be recognized as an independent risk factor for IHD [ischemic heart disease] ...

More Young Americans Developing Unhealthy Predictors of Heart Disease

A new study finds that 1 in 5 people under age 40 now have metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that together increase the odds for many serious conditions, including diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

The rate of metabolic syndrome is rising in all age groups -- as many as half of adults over 60 have it. But among 20- to 39-year-olds, the rate rose 5 percentage points over f...

Statins Tied to Significantly Lower Death Rate From Ovarian Cancer

Statin drugs, used for decades to treat high cholesterol, may also reduce deaths for women with ovarian cancer, a new study suggests.

"These drugs are appealing as they are widely used, inexpensive, and well-tolerated in most patients. The associated reduction in ovarian cancer mortality is promising," said lead researcher Dr. Kala Visvanathan, a professor of epidemiology and oncolog...

Tai Chi Could Be Good Medicine for Heart Patients

Tai chi might be just what doctors should order for their heart patients, new research suggests.

Many of these folks experience anxiety, stress and depression. For example, depression affects about 20% of people with heart disease or heart failure, 27% of those with high blood pressure, and 35% of stroke survivors.

Tai chi is a mind-body exercise that combines se...

Blood Pressure Meds Help the Frail Elderly Live Longer

Blood pressure drugs help even the most frail elderly live longer, and older people who are healthier get the biggest benefit, Italian researchers say.

"We knew that high blood pressure medication was protective in general among older people, however, we focused on whether it is also protective in frail patients with many other medical conditions who are usually excluded from randomi...

High Blood Pressure Might Raise COVID-19 Death Risk

Among patients in China with COVID-19, researchers found that those with high blood pressure had twice the risk of death from the coronavirus compared with patients who didn't have high blood pressure.

And patients with high blood pressure who were not taking drugs to control it were at even higher risk, the findings showed. However, the study only found an association and could not ...

AHA News: Both Blood Pressure Numbers Key to Pinpointing Heart Attack, Stroke Risk in Young Adults

High blood pressure of any kind in young adults increases the risk of heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular events, according to new findings that shed light on an issue experts say has been understudied.

Blood pressure readings have two measurements. Systolic is the top number and indicates how much pressure the blood exerts against artery walls while the heart beats. Diastol...

Could a Hormone Help Spur High Blood Pressure?

Many people with high blood pressure may have an unrecognized hormonal condition driving their numbers up, a new study suggests.

The condition, called primary aldosteronism, arises when the adrenal glands overproduce the hormone aldosterone. That causes the body to retain sodium and lose potassium, spurring a spike in blood pressure.

Doctors have long considered the conditio...

Lasting Spikes in Blood Pressure While Exercising Could Be Unhealthy Sign

Middle-aged men and women who develop high blood pressure while performing even moderate exercise may be at higher risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.

"The way our blood pressure changes during and after exercise provides important information on whether we will develop disease in the future," researcher Vanessa Xanthakis, assistant professor of medicine at Boston University...

1 in 5 Hospitalized NYC COVID-19 Patients Needed ICU Care

More than one-fifth of hospitalized COVID-19 patients in New York City have critical illness, and nearly 80% of critically ill patients need ventilators to help them breathe, according to a new study.

The findings have important implications for U.S. hospitals, specifically the need to prepare for large numbers of COVID-19 patients who require intensive care, the researchers said....

Intensive Blood Pressure Control Reduces A-Fib Risk: Study

Intensive high blood pressure treatment may protect against a-fib, a heart rhythm disorder that can lead to stroke, heart attack and heart failure, researchers say.

They analyzed data from more than 8,000 high blood pressure patients who were at increased risk of heart disease and enrolled in a U.S. National Institutes of Health trial known as SPRINT.

Participants were on e...

AHA News: Is High Blood Pressure Inevitable?

Almost every adult will face this health problem as they get older. But knowing how blood pressure might change over a lifetime can give people a better appreciation of why it's important to keep it in check at any age.

When left uncontrolled or if undetected, high blood pressure can lead to heart disease, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease or other major health problems.

"Pr...

Poor Americans Likely to Miss Preventive Heart Screenings: Study

Low-income Americans are much less likely to be screened for heart disease or to receive counseling about controlling risk factors, a new study finds.

Heart health screenings -- such as regular blood pressure and cholesterol checks -- and counseling to improve diet, increase exercise or quit smoking play important roles in reducing heart disease risk.

Income has long been as...

Tough Childhoods Are Tough on Adult Hearts: Study

Adults who had rough childhoods have higher odds for heart disease.

That's the conclusion from a look at more than 3,600 people who were followed from the mid-1980s through 2018. Researchers found that those who experienced the most trauma, abuse, neglect and family dysfunction in childhood were 50% more likely to have had a heart attack, stroke or other heart problem in their 50...

Heavy Drinking Tied to Raised Stroke Risk, Study Finds

Lots of boozing might increase your risk for a stroke, Swedish researchers report.

Heavy alcohol use can triple your risk for peripheral artery disease, a narrowing of arteries that results in reduced blood flow, usually to the legs. It can also increase your risk for stroke by 27%. There's also evidence of a link to coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation and aortic aneurys...

AHA News: More Intense Blood Pressure Control May Lower Irregular Heartbeat Risk

Aggressively treating high blood pressure might reduce the risk of a type of irregular heartbeat, according to a new study.

Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, can lead to stroke, heart failure and other cardiovascular complications. The condition is on the rise, with an estimated 12.1 million Americans expected to have it in 2030. The most common modifiable risk factor for AFib is high blood...