Using the RefillRx mobile app? Then you will love our new, ENHANCED Sentry Drug Center mobile app.
Quickly request refills or login and manage your prescriptions on the go!
Available on both iTunes and Google Play.

COVID VACCINE! Please CLICK HERE to schedule.

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: High Blood Pressure".

Health News Results - 260

Can Your Blood Pressure Medicine Protect Your Memory?

MONDAY, June 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who use certain blood pressure drugs may retain more of their memory skills as they age, a new study suggests.

Researchers found the benefit among older people taking medications that are allowed past the "blood-brain barrier," which is a border of specialized cells that prevents toxic substances from crossing into ...

Mom's Blood Pressure in Pregnancy Could Affect Child's Stroke Risk Decades Later

Expectant mothers' high blood pressure heightens kids' risk of stroke later in life, a Swedish study finds.

"Our findings indicate that hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are associated with increased risks of stroke and potentially heart disease in offspring up to the age of 41 years," said study author Fen Yang, a doctoral student at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm.

The stu...

Losing Weight Can Beat Diabetes and Also Help the Heart

An aggressive weight-loss program not only achieves remission of type 2 diabetes, but may also end the need for blood pressure medications, new research shows.

"Our study shows that, in addition to possible remission from type 2 diabetes, there are other very important health benefits, as weight loss is a very effective treatment for hypertension [high blood pressure] and its associated s...

Low-Salt 'DASH' Diet Good for Total Heart Health

It's consistently rated high among diets for all-around health, and a new report finds the DASH diet is all-around good for your heart, too.

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) regimen is designed to lower high blood pressure, but this new research shows that it also reduces inflammation, heart injury and strain.

The study provides "some of the strongest evidence that...

Fat Around Your Heart Could Be Especially Deadly

Too much fat around your heart could increase your risk of heart failure, especially if you're a woman, researchers warn.

They looked at nearly 7,000 45- to 84-year-olds across the United States who had no evidence of heart disease on initial CT scans. Over more than 17 years of followup, nearly 400 developed heart failure.

High amounts of fat around the heart -- pericardial fat -- ...

Elections Can Be Tough on Americans' Hearts

A U.S. presidential election can be hard on your heart.

That's the takeaway from two new studies that look back on the 2016 race between Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton.

For one, researchers investigated heart rhythm disorders in more than 2,400 adults in North Carolina (average age: 70.8 years) who had implanted defibrillators or pacemakers that could be monit...

Being a 'Night Owl' Raises Odds for Diabetes If You're Obese

Though obesity by itself can drive up heart disease risk, new research suggests diabetes and heart disease risk is especially high when combined with a tendency to stay up late at night.

The finding stems from a comparison of sleep patterns and disease in 172 middle-aged people as part of an ongoing obesity prevention study in Italy.

"The sleep-wake cycle is one of the most importan...

Road to Healthy Middle-Aged Brain May Begin in Childhood

Could having heart disease risk factors in childhood sow the seeds of thinking declines in middle-age?

It looks like it might, new research claims.

"I think it was not so big of a surprise for us, but maybe for the scientific community who have been focusing mainly on the midlife risk factors and old-age cognition," said study co-author Suvi Rovio. She is senior researcher of cardio...

Are You Taking a Med That's Raising Your Blood Pressure?

Nearly one in five Americans with high blood pressure use medications that can cause blood pressure to spike, a preliminary study shows.

The researchers said the findings are concerning, given how many people have difficulty controlling their high blood pressure.

"A large number of Americans are not meeting their blood pressure goals," said lead researcher Dr. John Vitarello, an int...

Air Pollution Can Harm Kids' Hearts for a Lifetime

Air pollution isn't hard on the hearts of adults only, suggests a new analysis that found it can raise blood pressure in kids as young as 5.

Children experienced increases in blood pressure if they had short-term exposure to air polluted with coarser particles or long-term exposure to finer airborne particles, and that also happened with long-term exposure to nitrogen dioxide, an air poll...

Heart Risk Factors Show Up Earlier in U.S. Black Women

Young Black American women have high rates of lifestyle-related risk factors for heart disease, a new study indicates.

The findings show the need to help them adopt healthy eating and physical activity habits, as well as make it easier for them to access health care, the researchers said.

"Young people should be the healthiest members of our population, with normal body weight and n...

Heart Disease Often Comes in Pairs, Spouse Study Shows

Couples share a lot together, but heart disease wouldn't be on any couples' list. However, new research out of China shows that if your spouse has heart disease you're likely at high risk for it, too.

Living together can often mean unhealthy habits are shared, explained the study's lead author.

"We found that an individual's cardiovascular disease risk is associated with the health...

Your Blood Type Might Raise Odds for Certain Health Conditions

Certain blood types may increase a person's risk of different health problems, a new study suggests.

The research confirms some previous findings and reveals new links between blood types and diseases, according to the authors of the study published April 27 in the journal eLife.

"There is still very little information available about whether people with RhD-positive or RhD...

New Advice for Blood Pressure That's a Bit Too High

If making healthy lifestyle changes doesn't lower a patient's slightly high blood pressure within six months, doctors should then consider prescribing medication, a new American Heart Association scientific statement advises.

The recommendation is for people with untreated stage 1 high blood pressure (130-139/80-89 mm Hg) who have a low risk of a heart attack or stroke within 10 years. Lo...

Migraine Before Menopause Could Be Linked to High Blood Pressure Later

If you suffered migraine headaches before menopause, you're at higher risk for high blood pressure once your periods stop, a new study warns.

Migraines occur more often in women than men, and are most common in the years before menopause, according to study author Gianluca Severi of the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research in Paris.

"Doctors may want to consider ...

'Disrupted' Sleep Could Be Seriously Affecting Your Health

Waking up briefly throughout the night may do more than leave you feeling grumpy and tired in the morning.

Disrupted sleep may actually increase your odds of dying early from heart disease or any other cause, and women seem to be harder hit by these effects than men.

"The data underscores all the more reasons why we need to be screening people about whether or not they feel refreshe...

How 'Bleeding' Stroke Affects Brain May Depend on Your Race

Black and Hispanic survivors of a bleeding stroke are more likely than white survivors to have changes in small blood vessels in the brain that increase the risk of another bleeding stroke, researchers say.

'Bleeding' strokes, also called hemorrhagic stroke, comprise about 13% of all strokes. They occur when an artery in the brain leaks or ruptures.

"While Black and Hispanic bleedin...

Unexplained Drop in Resting Heart Rate in Youth 'Not a Good Thing'

Children who have a sudden lowering of their resting heart rate as they move into young adulthood may be at increased risk for heart disease later in life, researchers report.

For their new study, they assessed data from 759 Black and white participants in the Augusta Heart Study, which was designed to evaluate the development of risk factors for heart disease. It followed young participa...

Hormone Treatments May Raise Blood Pressure in Transgender People

Monitoring blood pressure is important for transgender people, according to new research, which found changes in systolic blood pressure after the start of gender-affirming hormone therapy.

Transgender men and transgender women have a higher burden of heart attack, stroke and related conditions, the study noted.

Gender-affirming hormone therapy isn't new. Doctors have prescribed the...

AHA News: The Link Between Structural Racism, High Blood Pressure and Black People's Health

High blood pressure. Structural racism.

What do they have in common?

Researchers say they are two of the biggest factors responsible for the gap in poor heart and brain health between Black and white adults in the United States. And they are inextricably linked.

Studies show high blood pressure, also called hypertension, affects Black adults - particularly women - earlier and ...

Physically Active at Work? It's Not as Healthy as Leisure Exercise

Going for a brisk walk after a long day at work may be better for your heart than getting all of your exercise on the job.

New research suggests that while current health guidelines indicate that leisure-time activity and physical activity at work are created equally when it comes to heart health benefits, this may not be the case after all.

Leisure-time exercise -- whether it be ta...

Could Widely Used Blood Pressure Meds Raise Skin Cancer Risk?

Most people are familiar with common sun-protection advice, from wearing and reapplying sunscreen to putting on a hat.

But a new Canadian study finds that for people who take certain blood pressure medications, that advice becomes even more critical because those drugs can increase their sensitivity to the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

The researchers reviewed data for nearly...

Some Blood Pressure Meds Raise Heart Risks in People With HIV

Beta-blocker blood pressure medications may increase the risk of heart problems in people with HIV, new research suggests.

For the study, the researchers reviewed the medical records of more than 8,000 U.S. veterans with HIV who developed high blood pressure between 2000 and 2018. Of those, around 6,500 had never been diagnosed with heart or blood vessel problems.

At the start ...

Diet High in Processed Meats Could Shorten Your Life

That piece of sausage you're about to enjoy? You may want to put it down for something healthier.

New research found an association between eating even small amounts of processed meats, 150 grams (a little over 5 ounces) per week, and a higher risk of major heart disease and death.

But not all meat is bad: The study, which includes data from 21 countries, also found that eating up t...

Healthy Living in Middle Age Really Pays Off in Senior Years

Live well, live longer.

New research offers more evidence that the mantra rings true: People who got regular exercise and ate a healthy diet in middle age had a reduced risk of serious health problems as seniors.

"Health care professionals could use these findings to further promote and emphasize to their patients the benefits of a healthy diet and a regular exercise schedule t...

Black Adults Face 4 Times the Odds for Stroke as Whites

Once Black Americans reach age 40, their blood pressure often begins a rapid climb, putting them at significantly higher risk of stroke than their white counterparts, a new study warns.

Middle-aged Black people have roughly four times the stroke risk faced by white Americans, according to the analysis of data from nearly 5,100 patients.

"High blood pressure is the single most import...

Study Ties Gum Disease to High Blood Pressure

Want to ward off high blood pressure? Don't forget to brush and floss.

A new study finds that severe gum disease may make an otherwise healthy person significantly more likely to develop high blood pressure.

"[Our] evidence indicates that periodontal bacteria cause damage to the gums and also triggers inflammatory responses that can impact the development of systemic diseases includ...

Unhealthy in Your 20s? Your Mind May Pay the Price Decades Later

If you're a 20-something who wants to stay sharp, listen up: A new study suggests poor health habits now may increase your risk of mental decline later in life.

Its authors say young adulthood may be the most critical time for adopting a healthy lifestyle in order to keep your brain sharp when you're older.

That's the upshot of an analysis of data from about 15,000 adults who were p...

Beta Blockers Won't Cause Depression, But Might Impair Sleep: Study

Millions of people take a beta blocker regularly, and a new study brings good news: The medications will not raise the risk of depression.

Beta blockers are used to treat conditions such as heart failure, chest pains, high blood pressure and abnormal heart rhythm. But it's long been suspected that the drugs may be linked with depression, anxiety, drowsiness, insomnia, hallucinations and n...

'Race Gap' in U.S. Heart Health Has Changed Little in 20 Years: Report

Black Americans who live in rural areas are two to three times more likely to die from diabetes and high blood pressure compared with white rural folks, and this gap hasn't changed much over the last 20 years, new research shows.

The study spanned from 1999 through 2018, and will be published as a research letter in the March 23 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiolo...

High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy Is Linked to Shorter Life Spans for Women

High blood pressure during pregnancy may lead to early death from heart disease, a new study suggests.

There are several types of high blood pressure (also known as hypertension) during pregnancy. Chronic hypertension means high blood pressure was already present before a pregnancy, but in gestational hypertension readings rise during pregnancy. A third form, called preeclampsia, occurs w...

Science Reveals Why Tea Is Good for Your Heart

If a nice hot cup of tea sounds good to you, there's even more reason to enjoy one now. Scientists have gained new insight into how tea helps lower blood pressure, perhaps pointing the way to new types of blood pressure medications.

The researchers found that certain compounds in both black and green tea help relax blood vessels by activating ion channel proteins in the walls of blood ves...

High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy Could Affect Women's Hearts Long Term

Pregnancy-related high blood pressure can lead to long-term heart risks, new research shows.

Compared to those with normal blood pressure during pregnancy, women who developed blood pressure disorders such as preeclampsia and gestational hypertension had significant differences in heart structure and function a decade after giving birth.

These differences mainly affect the heart's l...

More Young U.S. Women Are Dying From Heart Disease

The toll of America's obesity epidemic is showing up in younger women, as a new study shows that deaths from heart disease in this unlikely group have increased in the past decade.

The likely culprits along with obesity? Type 2 diabetes, along with diseases of pregnancy, such as preeclampsia and preterm delivery, researchers said.

"Cardiovascular disease mortality is going up in you...

Daily Green Tea, Coffee Tied to Lower Risk for 2nd Heart Attack, Stroke

If you have had a heart attack and a stroke, you might want to stock up on green tea.

New research from Japan finds survivors who drink plenty of green tea may live longer lives.

Stroke survivors who drank at least seven cups per day were 62% less likely to die during the study period, versus non-drinkers. Similarly, the risk was cut by 53% among heart attack survivors who downed th...

High Blood Pressure Often Mistaken for Menopausal Symptoms in Women


High blood pressure is often dismissed as part of menopausal symptoms in older women, experts say. And that could raise a woman's risk for heart trouble, European experts warn.

That warning, along with recommendations on how doctors can help middle-aged women avoid future heart problems, is included in a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) consensus document published Jan. 27 in...

Male Breast Cancer Patients Face Higher Heart Risks

Heart disease risk factors are common among men with breast cancer, a new, small study finds.

Researchers analyzed the medical records of 24 male breast cancer patients, aged 38 to 79. Half had a family history of breast cancer.

Nearly 8 in 10 of the patients had invasive ductal carcinoma, which is the most common type of breast cancer and occurs when cancer starts in the breast duc...

Diabetes Boosts Odds for Heart Trouble 10-fold in Younger Women

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) - - With rising obesity rates, more young women American women are developing type 2 diabetes, putting them at hugely increased risk for heart disease, new research shows.

In fact, the study found that women under 55 with type 2 diabetes had a tenfold greater risk of having heart disease over the next two decades compared to their non-diabetic peer...

New Hope Against Diseases Marked by Progressive Scarring of Lung Tissue

An inhaled medication might make every day physical activity a bit easier for patients with serious scarring of the lungs, a new clinical trial finds.

The study, published online Jan. 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine, involved patients with high blood pressure in the lungs caused by interstitial lung disease (ILD).

ILD is a broad term for progressive scarring of th...

Calorie-Burning 'Brown Fat' Could Help Keep You Healthy, Even if You're Obese

A special calorie-burning type of body fat appears to help protect against an array of chronic ailments, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, a new study suggests.

Brown fat generates heat by drawing glucose from the bloodstream, as opposed to energy-storing white fat, explained senior researcher Dr. Paul Cohen. He's an assistant professor and senior attending...

Common Blood Pressure Meds Won't Up Risks for COVID Patients: Study

Americans battling hypertension may have one less thing to worry about: Blood pressure drugs do not affect outcomes of people hospitalized with COVID-19, a new study finds.

Researchers looked at whether two types of medications used to treat high blood pressure -- ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) -- could either lessen complications or lead to more severe COVID sympt...

Certain Antibiotics Linked With Upped Risk for Deadly Aortic Aneurysms

A widely used class of antibiotics has been linked to an increased risk of a potentially fatal blood vessel condition -- even in younger, healthy people.

In a study of millions of antibiotic prescriptions made in the United States, researchers found that one class was associated with a small increase in the risk of aortic aneurysm.

The drugs -- called fluoroquinolones -- have been a...

Heart Risk Factors May Be Especially Unhealthy in People With Psoriasis

People with metabolic syndrome and the skin condition psoriasis are at especially high risk for heart attack and stroke, a new study warns.

Psoriasis has been known to increase the risk of heart disease, but researchers have now pegged metabolic syndrome as a key reason.

Metabolic syndrome is a condition that includes obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure -- al...

High Blood Pressure While Pregnant Linked to Poorer Memory Years Later

High blood pressure and pre-eclampsia during pregnancy may follow women through the years, causing lower scores on tests of memory and thinking skills, a Dutch study suggests.

The study of nearly 600 pregnant women included 481 with normal blood pressure and 115 who developed high blood pressure during their pregnancies.

Of those 115 women, 70% had gestational hypertension, which is...

Blood Pressure Often Differs Widely Between Two Arms: Study

Blood pressure readings between the two arms can be different, and that disparity can sometimes be a warning sign of heart trouble down the road.

That's the finding of an analysis of 24 past studies: When people have at least a 5-point difference in blood pressure between the two arms, their risk of heart attack, stroke or premature death inches up. And the greater the difference, the mor...

AHA News: Given a Grim Prognosis, Stroke Survivor Proved Doctors Wrong

Mark Kincaid greeted spectators coming to the high school football game as he collected donations for his son's baseball team. His daughter, a cheerleader, was on the field while his wife and one of their three sons watched the game.

As a woman dropped money into Mark's bucket, his expression went blank. He stumbled backward. A friend standing nearby caught Mark before he fell. He tried t...

Heart Disease Is World's No. 1 Killer

Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide -- accounting for one-third of deaths in 2019 -- and the death toll continues to rise, a new paper says.

China had the highest number of heart disease deaths last year, followed by India, Russia, the United States and Indonesia. Heart disease death rates were lowest in France, Peru and Japan, where rates were six times lower than in 19...

Obesity Plays Role in Higher Breast Cancer Rates for Black Women

Obesity may be a major reason Black American women with early breast cancer are 40% more likely to die than white patients, according to a new study.

Obesity is a known risk factor for several types of cancer, and decades of rising rates of obesity in the United States have contributed to climbing breast cancer rates greater in Black women than white women.

And even though breast ca...

Metabolites' From Food Could Affect Your Stroke Risk

Levels of some small molecules called metabolites in the body may affect your risk of stroke, a new analysis suggests.

Metabolites come from the food people eat, and they cause chemical processes within the bodies and microbes. An analysis of previously published studies found that the levels of 10 of these are linked to the risk of stroke.

These include lipids, fatty acids, amino ...

Diabetes, High Blood Pressure Raise Odds of COVID Harming Brain

COVID-19 patients with high blood pressure or diabetes may be more likely to develop critical neurological complications, including bleeding in the brain and stroke, according to an ongoing study.

University of Pennsylvania researchers studied COVID-19 patients who had a head CT scan or MRI within their health system between January and April 2020. In all, 81 of the 1,357 COVID-19 patien...