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Results for search "Psychology / Mental Health: Misc.".

Health News Results - 572

Delirium May Be Only Sign of Severe COVID in Elderly: Study


Delirium is often the first symptom of COVID-19 to appear in older people, a new study finds.

They may have confusion with an altered level of consciousness, disorientation, inattention and other mental disturbances, but none of the other typical signs of the coronavirus infection, such as fever and cough, researchers say.

"COVID can operate throu...

Anxiety Might Speed Alzheimer's: Study

Older adults with memory problems may progress to Alzheimer's more quickly if they are also suffering from anxiety symptoms, a preliminary study suggests.

It's common for people with Alzheimer's disease to have mood symptoms, including anxiety and depression. And some research has suggested those symptoms can, in older people, act as early indicators of the dementia process.

The new...

Coping With Lockdown Loneliness During the Holidays


Pandemic lockdowns will increase Americans' risk of loneliness and depression this holiday season, an expert warns.

"People are grieving for similar reasons: loss of family members, jobs, relationships, friendships and physical touch. Everyone is suffering," said Dr. Asim Shah. He's professor and executive vice chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Baylor College of Medicine ...

More Childbearing Women Having Suicidal Thoughts: Study


The number of women who contemplate suicide or self-harm during or after pregnancy may be on the rise, a large, new study suggests.

Among nearly 600,000 U.S. childbearing women, researchers found that close to 2,700 were diagnosed with suicidality in the year before or after giving birth. And the diagnosis -- defined as suicidal thoughts or intentional self-...

Many Young Americans Lonely, Depressed During Pandemic: Survey

Loneliness, anxiety, depression and substance use have increased sharply among young American adults during the COVID-19 pandemic, a survey shows.

Over 1,000 people aged 18 to 35 took part in the online anonymous questionnaire between April 22 and May 11, 2020. Nearly half reported high levels of loneliness, eight in 10 had significant depressive symptoms, and more than 60% said they had ...

Dirty Air Endangers Homeless People: Study

Air pollution poses a threat to homeless people's mental and physical health, researchers say.

They asked 138 homeless people in Salt Lake City about when and how they knew the air was polluted and how air pollution makes them feel. They also examined their health records.

More than half the people said they'd had physical reactions to air pollution (such as headaches and difficulty...

Are You Feeling 'Pandemic Fatigue'?

As COVID-19 case numbers surge across the United States, some people are experiencing pandemic fatigue after many months of social distancing, mask wearing and quarantines.

Experts from Penn State Health stressed the importance of continued vigilance and following established safety efforts to slow the spread of the virus, while also offering suggestions for minding mental health while b...

Amid Lockdowns, Online Exercise Classes Help Seniors Feel Less Alone

Participating in group exercise classes is good for seniors and not just in the ways one might expect.

The classes reduce loneliness and social isolation, according to a new study. And early results suggest that's true even after the coronavirus pandemic forced those classes to meet virtually.

"As the demographics of our country shift, more people are living alone than ever before,"...

Is the Pandemic Harming Kids' Mental Health?

FRIDAY, Nov. 13, 2020 (HealthDay) -- Since last April, hospital emergency rooms across the United States have seen a sustained surge in visits related to the mental health of school-aged kids, a new report reveals.

The findings suggest the COVID-19 pandemic is taking a toll on children because of disruptions to their everyday life, anxiety about illness and social isolation. That conclusi...

Tips to Cope With Lockdown as Cold Weather Arrives

Isolation may pose mental health challenges for people as they spend more time indoors in the winter during the coronavirus pandemic, an expert warns.

Maintaining safe forms of social contact is crucial, especially for people who live alone, according to Frank Ghinassi, president and CEO of Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care, in New Jersey.

Ideas to battle isolation include s...

B 11/11 Who Are The Loneliest Americans, And Why?

Young adults are the loneliest Americans, according to a new study that examined the causes of loneliness throughout adulthood.

Researchers analyzed responses from more than 2,800 people nationwide (ages 20-69) who participated in an online survey.

They found that levels of loneliness were highest among 20-somethings and lowest among respondents in their 60s. Loneliness reached anot...

Did Your Candidate Lose the Election? Study Finds Depression May Follow

American presidential elections are clearly divisive, but a new analysis suggests they may trigger depression in residents of states that favored the losing candidate.

The investigators gauged the mental health of roughly half a million Americans after the 2016 presidential election. The upshot: Stress and depression risk went up significantly in those states that had gone for Hillary Cl...

'Green Prescriptions' May Backfire for Some

So-called "green prescriptions" may end up being counterproductive for people with mental health conditions, researchers say.

Spending time in nature is believed to benefit mental health, so some doctors are beginning to "prescribe" outdoor time for their patients.

That led researchers to investigate whether being in nature helps actually does help people with issues such as anxiety...

Teens Benefit With Less Screen Time, More Time With Sports and Art

Walking away from TV, laptops and cellphones and spending more time in sports and other extracurricular activities boosts teens' mental health, Canadian researchers say.

Spending less than two hours a day browsing the internet, playing video games and using social media was linked to increased levels of life satisfaction and optimism and lower levels of anxiety and depression, especially ...

Coping With the Stress of This Election

Americans who woke up this morning to an undecided Presidential election might rightfully be feeling lots of anxiety, both about their personal futures as well as the fate of the nation.

There are plentiful jokes online about drinking election stress away, but mental health experts instead are urging healthier ways to cope with the anxiety of a country on the edge.

First and foremos...

For Rural Youth, Mental Health Care Can Be Tough to Find

While young Americans' mental health appears to be getting worse, the places where help is needed most appear to have the fewest resources.

A new study published in JAMA Network Open found that rural areas of the United States have fewer mental health services for young people. Previous studies have reported that they also have higher rates of youth suicide than urban areas do.

Lockdowns Made Taming Obesity Even Tougher, Research Shows

People struggling with obesity fared poorly during the COVID-19 lockdowns earlier this year, with their weight-control plans flying off the rails as they coped with the stress of the global pandemic, two new studies report.

Seven out of 10 people with obesity reported that their weight-loss goals became harder to achieve during the lockdown, according to a survey conducted by UT Southwest...

Upbeat Outlook Could Shield Your Brain

Being positive may help protect your memory as you age, a new study indicates.

Researchers analyzed data from almost 1,000 middle-aged and older U.S. adults who took part in a national study. The upshot: Being upbeat pays dividends.

Participants were assessed three times: between 1995 and 1996, 2004 and 2006, and 2013 and 2014. At each assessment, the participants describe...

Your Teachers May Have Been Key to Your Adult Mental Health

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2020 (Health Day News) -- Great teachers can make a big difference in their students' long-term health, research shows.

Teenagers who had good, supportive relationships with their teachers became healthier adults, according to a new report.

"This research suggests that improving students' relationships with teachers could have important, positive and long-lasting eff...

Newborn Brains Don't Process Emotions Like Adults

Newborns don't have the brain circuitry to process emotions, a new study finds.

Brain scans of newborns found that the area of the brain that experiences emotions isn't connected in a mature way to areas that process visual or auditory stimuli, researchers say.

In adults, these connections enable us to feel fear when we watch a scary movie, or love when we see a spouse or family mem...

For Some Black Women, DNA Could Magnify Racism's Toll on Health

Many aspects of daily living can trigger stress. But for Black women, everyday stressors plus racial discrimination and a specific genetic mutation may increase the risk for obesity, diabetes and heart disease, researchers say.

The EBF1 mutation is found in roughly 2% of Black women and 7% of white people. And according to study co-author Abanish Singh, it has previously been lin...

Lockdowns Got Your Teen Down? Here's How to Help

If you're the parent of a teen, you had plenty to deal with before the pandemic began -- dramatic sighs, slamming doors, eye-rolling -- and that was only when your teen wasn't out somewhere with friends.

But the coronavirus pandemic brought your teen's social life to a screeching halt. No more in-person school, no more sports, no more clubs and definitely no hanging out with friends or a ...

How Teachers Can Manage Burnout During the Pandemic

Many teachers are suffering from burnout as they try to cope with teaching during a pandemic, worrying about managing students and dealing with anxiety about their own health.

But Ann Murphy, director of the Northeast and Caribbean Mental Health Technology Transfer Center at Rutgers School of Health Professions in New Jersey, says teachers can manage stress and anxiety during this challen...

NYC Transit Workers Hit Hard by COVID-19: Survey

The COVID-19 pandemic is taking a significant toll on New York City transit workers, who are grappling with illness, anxiety and the loss of colleagues.

About 24% of transit workers who participated in a pilot study led by New York University researchers reported having had COVID-19. About 76% said they knew a colleague who had died of the disease and 90% feared they also would get sick.<...

Most Americans Anxious About Climate Change: Poll

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2020 (Healthday News) -- Nearly 7 in 10 Americans are very anxious about the effect of climate change on the planet and more than half worry about its impact on their mental health, a new poll reveals.

The percentage of Americans who say climate change is probably or definitely affecting their mental health rose from 47% last year to 68% in 2020. And 73% say it is affe...

Losing a Sibling a Common Tragedy in Poorer Nations, Study Finds

The loss of a sibling is all too common among young women in low- and middle-income countries, according to a new study.

The researchers found that roughly one-third of young women in those countries have experienced the death of a brother or sister by age 25. In several African nations, the rate is as high as 50%.

"There's extensive social science research on family dynamics and ch...

Losing a Sibling a Common Tragedy in Poorer Nations, Study Finds

The loss of a sibling is all too common among young women in low- and middle-income countries, according to a new study.

The researchers found that roughly one-third of young women in those countries have experienced the death of a brother or sister by age 25. In several African nations, the rate is as high as 50%.

"There's extensive social science research on family dyn...

Got Election Anxiety? Experts Have Coping Tips

It may be no surprise that this year's presidential election is taking a toll on the mental health of Americans.

In a new Harris Poll survey, conducted on behalf of the American Psychological Association, 68% of U.S. adults said the 2020 election is a significant source of stress in their lives.

"The brain, body, the entire system -- all are trying to adjust to ...

'Tough Guy' Mentality Keeps Athletes in Denial About Pain

A culture of toughness and resilience is encouraged among elite college rowers, but it can keep them from reporting injuries, a new study finds.

There's an overall myth among athletes that admitting pain is a sign of weakness and failure, the researchers said.

Irish and Australian rowers in this study felt compromised by lower back pain, which is common in the sport, the st...

Politics Key to Americans' Views on COVID-19, Poll Shows

The new coronavirus holds no political views. The pathogen's only aim is to infect, spread and thrive.

But in what is surely no surprise in a deeply divided America, it turns out that your political views play a large role in your attitude towards COVID-19 prevention efforts.

Republicans tend to be much less worried than Democrats about the COVID-19 pandemic, and therefore l...

More Than Half of Americans Know Someone Infected or Ill With COVID: Poll

More than half of all Americans have been personally affected by COVID-19 at this point in the pandemic, according to a new HealthDay-Harris Poll survey.

The national survey was conducted by The Harris Poll between Oct. 8 and 12. It found that 55% of U.S. adults now say they know someone in their immediate or extended network of family and acquaintances who's been infected,...

Pandemic Fears Tied to Surge in Gun Sales in California

Citing fears over violence and chaos, more than 100,000 Californians have bought guns in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study estimates.

Researchers said the findings add to evidence that the U.S. pandemic has sparked firearm "panic-buying." Early on, federal figures showed a spike in background checks, while some online firearm retailers reported soaring sales, according to...

Is There a Better Therapy for Hospitalized Anorexia Patients?

It may seem counterintuitive, but when someone with the eating disorder anorexia nervosa is hospitalized, treatment often begins by cutting calories. Now, new research suggests that those eating restrictions can be safely relaxed in the hospital.

Starting with a lower-calorie diet has long been thought to prevent big shifts in fluid and electrolytes that can lead to cardiac arrest, c...

Pandemic Putting Americans Under Great Mental Strain: Poll

COVID-19, health care, the economy, systemic racism and the presidential election are a threat to the nation's mental health, according to an American Psychological Association (APA) poll.

Seventy-eight percent of adults polled said the pandemic is causing major stress and 60% called the array of issues facing the country overwhelming.

And younger adults are really str...

Bogus 'Cure' Claims Have U.S. Consumers Snapping Up CBD Products

CBD has been widely marketed as a cure-all for whatever ails you, and a new study finds many Americans are buying the sales pitch.

Researchers tracking a Reddit forum on CBD found many folks discussing use of cannabidiol to treat conditions for which there are proven, safe and effective medicines and therapies.

Forum participants said they were using CBD for mental and emotional...

Is Apathy an Early Sign of Dementia?

Older adults who aren't interested or enthusiastic about their usual activities may have a higher risk of developing dementia, new research suggests.

The nine-year study of more than 2,000 older adults -- average age 74 -- found that people with severe apathy (a lack of interest or concern) were 80% more likely to develop dementia during the study period than those with low apath...

Want Better Rapport With Your Cat? Bat Your Eyes

When it comes to bonding with your cat, the eyes have it.

Narrowing your eyes -- the so-called "slow blink" -- may make humans more attractive to their feline friends, British researchers suggest. It also may make kitty smile back.

"As someone who has both studied animal behavior and is a cat owner, it's great to be able to show that cats and humans can communicate in this w...

For Kids Who Hit Puberty Early, Risk of Self-Harm Rises

Kids who reach puberty earlier than other kids are at an increased risk of harming themselves as teens, British researchers report.

"Our study is the first to investigate the relationship between the timing of puberty and self-harm using an objective measure of pubertal timing in boys," said lead author Elystan Roberts, a researcher at the University of Bristol.

He said it...

If Election Stress Is Getting to You, You're Not Alone

For most Americans, the 2020 presidential election is a big source of stress, a new nationwide survey shows.

Nearly seven in 10 adults (68%) surveyed called the election a significant source of stress, compared with 52% in 2016, the survey commissioned by the American Psychological Association (APA) showed.

Former Vice President Joe Biden, a Democrat, is trying to un...

Depressed Teens May Struggle in School

By about age 16, teens diagnosed with depression have substantially lower educational attainment, a new British study finds.

Targeted educational support might be of particular benefit to teens from poor backgrounds and boys, but all children with depression can benefit from such help, the study authors suggested.

For the study, the researchers used British health and edu...

For Black Americans, Personal Resilience Plays Big Part in Heart Health

Black people who have a strong sense of psychological well-being may have better heart health, a new study indicates.

It suggests that feelings of optimism and a sense of purpose and control -- hallmarks of psychosocial resilience -- are more important to heart health than where people live, researchers said.

Lead researcher Tené Lewis, an associate professor at Emo...

Me, Me, Me: Narcissists Drawn to Politics, Study Shows

It's all about him. Or her.

New research supports what much of the electorate may already suspect: Many narcissistic people are drawn to politics, and that could put democracy in danger.

As the researchers defined it, narcissism is a combination of selfishness, entitlement and a need for admiration.

"Successful democratic functioning requires trust in institutions...

Chrissy Teigen's Pregnancy Loss Spotlights a Hidden Source of Grief for Many

Chrissy Teigen's public disclosure of her pregnancy loss is shining new light on a trauma for couples that's too often left in the shadows.

The 34-year-old model, cookbook author and social media star announced the loss of her baby boy via Twitter Thursday. She was thought to be halfway through a pregnancy with a baby she and her husband, singer John Legend, had already named Jack.

Mental Health Issues Double the Odds of Dying With COVID-19, Study Finds

People suffering from a psychiatric disorder could be more than twice as likely to die if they become infected with COVID-19, a new study suggests.

Folks diagnosed with any type of psychiatric problem -- anxiety or depression, dementia, psychosis -- were up to 2.3 times more likely to die in the hospital from COVID-19, researchers found.

"Those who had COVID who had a prior ...

Pets Helped People Cope During Pandemic Lockdown: Study

Pets helped many people cope with the mental stress of being locked down during the coronavirus pandemic, a new study finds.

It included 6,000 people in Britain who were under lockdown between March 23 and June 1. About 90% had at least one pet.

Of those, more than 90% said their pet helped them cope emotionally with the lockdown and 96% said their pet helped kee...

Pandemic Has More Americans Turning to Booze

Is the coronavirus pandemic driving people to drink?

Yes, a new U.S. survey shows, and the greatest spike in alcohol use is being seen in women.

Overall, there was a 14% jump in drinking frequency this past spring among U.S. adults over 30 when compared to last year at the same time, researchers found. Among women, drinking frequency went up 17%.

But excess...

Severe Mental Illnesses Often Overlooked at Hospital Admission: Study

Severe mental illness diagnoses often get missed in patients hospitalized for physical health problems, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 13,800 U.K. adults who were diagnosed with severe mental illness, including bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, between 2006 and 2017 and who had more than 45,700 emergency hospital admissions over the period.

Kids Often Hit Hard by Death of Beloved Pet, Study Finds

The loss of a pet may be a child's first encounter with death, and new research suggests no one should underestimate the psychological trauma that the loss can bring.

Previous studies have found that kids form deep emotional attachments to their pets and having a furry companion in your youth has been linked to greater empathy, self-esteem and social skills.

"The effects of...

Baby's Heart Rate Reflects Mom's Mental Health

Babies of mothers with anxiety or depression can have significantly higher heart rates than normal, a new study finds.

And this might put them at risk for long-term problems, researchers say.

Mother-infant interaction plays a crucial role in children's healthy development, but moms with depression, anxiety or postnatal depression may be emotionally distant from their infants...

Middle-Aged Americans Report More Pain Than Seniors

Middle-aged Americans are living with more physical pain than older adults are -- and the problem is concentrated among the less-educated, a new study finds.

The pattern may seem counterintuitive, since older age generally means more chronic health conditions and wear-and-tear on the body. And the middle-age pain peak is not seen in other wealthy countries, researchers said.

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