Using the RefillRx mobile app? Then you will love our new, ENHANCED Sentry Drug Center mobile app.
Quickly request refills or login and manage your prescriptions on the go!
Available on both iTunes and Google Play.

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Insurance: Medicaid".

Health News Results - 48

Obamacare Means 2 Million Fewer Americans Face Catastrophic Medical Bills Each Year

Since the passage of "Obamacare," fewer Americans are facing insurmountable medical bills -- but the benefit does not seem to be reaching people with private insurance, a new study shows.

Researchers found that after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was implemented, the number of Americans incurring "catastrophic" health care expenses each year dropped -- from 13.6 million in 2010 to 11....

Breast Cancer Caught Earlier in U.S. States With Expanded Medicaid: Study

Early-stage breast cancer is more likely to be diagnosed in U.S. states that have expanded Medicaid coverage under Obamacare than in those that haven't, researchers say.

Their new study looked at a database of more than 71,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer in 31 states that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act and 14 states that did not.

In the expan...

Obamacare Helps Poorer Americans Spot Cancer Earlier: Study

Medicaid expansion under Obamacare may have decreased the number of poorer Americans diagnosed with advanced cancer, a new study suggests.

The study focused on Ohio, which was among the first states to expand its Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2014.

The researchers found that in the three years after expansion, low-income residents saw a 15% dro...

Obamacare Linked to Fewer Leg Amputations for Minorities

There's been a significant drop in diabetes-related lower leg amputations among non-white patients in states that expanded Medicaid under Obamacare, a new study finds.

About one-third of people with diabetes develop a foot ulcer, which is the most common cause of foot infection and leg amputation. More than half who have a diabetes-related leg amputation die within five years -- a rat...

Are Food Allergies Under-Diagnosed in Poor Families?

Food allergies may be under-diagnosed among children covered by Medicaid, a new study suggests.

"We were surprised to find such a large discrepancy in estimates of food allergy prevalence in children on Medicaid compared to the general population," said senior study author Dr. Ruchi Gupta, a pediatrician and food allergy researcher at Children's Hospital of Chicago.

"Our fin...

Obamacare's Medicaid Expansion Might Have Cut U.S. Cancer Deaths

Cancer death rates have declined more in U.S. states that expanded Medicaid after the Affordable Care Act than in those that didn't, a new study finds.

"This is the first study to show the benefit of Medicaid expansion on cancer death rates on a national scale," said lead author Dr. Anna Lee, a radiation oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

...

Obamacare May Have Boosted Use of Mammograms

Medicaid expansion under Obamacare has increased access to mammograms for impoverished older women, a new study suggests.

In those states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), women who didn't have access to this breast cancer screening tool have it now, the study authors said.

"The ACA created a natural experiment in which some states expanded Medica...

Obamacare May Help Many Laid-Off Workers Get Health Insurance

Millions of Americans in industries hard-hit by the coronavirus pandemic could be eligible for financial help with health insurance, a new study says.

Many of the newly unemployed might not know they can get public insurance or subsidies for coverage through the Affordable Care Act's insurance marketplaces, according to an analysis published this month by the Urban Institute, a Wash...

As Unemployment and COVID-19 Cases Rise, Who Will Pay for Care?

The coronavirus pandemic is spreading across the United States at the same time that millions have been laid off from their jobs.

That raises the obvious question -- how will those newly unemployed folks pay for medical care if they become infected with the coronavirus?

Recent bills passed by Congress ensure that people won't have to pay out of pocket for any COVID-19 testin...

U.S. Drug Prices Have Risen Three Times Faster Than Inflation

Over the course of a decade, the net cost of prescription drugs in the United States rose more than three times faster than the rate of inflation, a new study finds.

The net cost of a drug refers to the sticker price minus manufacturer discounts.

Researchers in the University of Pittsburgh's Center for Pharmaceutical Policy and Prescribing (CP3) conducted the analysis on net...

Fewer American Families Weighed Down by Medical Bills

The number of people struggling to pay their medical bills declined dramatically during the last decade, as the Affordable Care Act expanded health insurance coverage and financial protection for the sick.

The percentage of families who had problems paying medical expenses in the previous year declined from about 20% in 2011 to 14% in 2018, according to a new report from the U...

Medicaid Expansion Meant More Poor in 'Diabetes Belt' Got Insurance

There was a steep drop in the number of low-income people without health insurance in so-called Diabetes Belt states that expanded Medicaid under Obamacare, a new study shows.

The Diabetes Belt is a swath of 644 U.S. counties across 15 southeastern states that have high diabetes rates.

More than 11% of adults in the Diabetes Belt have the condition, compared with 8.5...

1 in 5 Insured Hit With Surprise Bills for Surgery

You scheduled your surgery and made sure both your doctor and hospital are in your insurer's approved network of providers. Everything went without a hitch -- until a whopper of a bill showed up in the mail for "out-of-network" care during your operation.

The average out-of-network surprise bill tops $2,000, a new study finds. And about 20% of patients who had surgery using a doc...

2 Million Lost Health Coverage or Access in Trump's First Year

Two million more Americans didn't seek health care from late 2016 through 2017 because they couldn't afford it and/or lacked insurance, new research shows.

The analysis of data from 2011 through 2017 also found that health care coverage and access improved with implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but reversed after President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans bega...

HIV Drug Costs Soaring, Jeopardizing Effort to End Epidemic

The U.S. government aims to end the HIV epidemic by 2030, but skyrocketing medication costs may make that a pipe dream, a new study suggests.

Since 2012, the cost of antiviral treatment for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, has jumped 34%. That's nearly four times the inflation rate.

Even with new generic options, initial treatments now top $36,000 per patient per year,...

Obamacare May Have Boosted Jobs, Education for Poor

The Affordable Care Act might have done more than provide more Americans with health insurance: New research suggests accompanying expansions in Medicaid may be linked to higher numbers of low-income people having jobs or going to school.

That's what happened after Michigan expanded its Medicaid under new rules from the Affordable Care Act.

Researchers surveyed more than 3,0...

Despite Obamacare, Number in U.S. Who Can't Afford to See Doctor Keeps Rising

Even though the Affordable Care Act expanded access to health insurance, the number of Americans who can't afford to see a doctor keeps increasing, a new study shows.

The researchers found that compared with two decades ago, more Americans today say they have skipped a needed trip to the doctor due to costs, despite a roughly 60% increase in people with health insurance.

How Obamacare Helped Some Southern States

The physical and mental health of poor people is less likely to be at risk in Southern U.S. states that expanded their Medicaid programs under Obamacare, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 15,500 low-income adults in 12 Southern states and found that Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act reduced the risk of declines in health, particularly among tho...

Obamacare May Have Prevented Many Opioid-Related Deaths

The Medicaid expansion brought in by Obamacare may have prevented thousands of deaths from opioid overdoses, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that in U.S. states that expanded their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act, fatal opioid overdoses dipped by 6%, compared to states that opted out. That included an 11% lower death rate from heroin overdoses, and a 10...

Medical Paperwork Costs U.S. $812 Billion a Year

Medical paperwork cost the United States $812 billion in 2017 and accounted for more than one-third of total spending for doctor visits, hospitals, long-term care and health insurance, according to a new study.

However, reducing medical paperwork expenses to the same levels as in Canada -- which has single-payer universal health care -- would have saved the nation more than $600 billi...

Young Cancer Patients Fare Better on Private Insurance

The odds of surviving childhood cancer may be influenced by the type of health insurance a young patient has, researchers say.

In a new study, children and young adults covered by Medicaid or other government agencies were less likely to be alive five and 10 years after their cancer diagnosis than those with private insurance.

"Patients with Medicaid have less access to prim...

Heart Medicines Priced Out of Reach for Many Americans

Many working-age Americans struggle to pay for the heart medications that protect them from heart attack, stroke and heart disease, a new study reports.

About one in eight adults suffering from a high-risk heart problem say financial strain has caused them to skip taking their meds, delay filling a prescription, or take a lower dose than prescribed, the researchers said.

Tho...

Married Women Gained Most From Obamacare's Medicaid Expansion: Study

Married people, especially women, benefited more than singles after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) expanded Medicaid insurance coverage in the United States, a new study finds.

The ACA allowed states to expand Medicaid coverage for adults, and 25 did so by 2014. Since then, coverage rates have increased more in expansion states than elsewhere.

But the impact of marital status...

Is Your State One of the 'Most Obese' in America?

The number of U.S. states with adult obesity rates above 35% reached an all-time high of nine in 2018, a new report says.

In 2018, the nine states with adult obesity rates above 35% were: Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota and West Virginia.

That's two more than the year before. As recently as 2012, no state topped 35...

Need Emergency Air Lift to Hospital? It Could Cost You $40,000

An air ambulance might be your only chance to survive a medical emergency -- but a new study reports it's going to cost you.

The median charge of an air ambulance trip was $39,000 in 2016, about 60% more than the $24,000 charged just four years earlier, researchers found.

That amount is "more than half of the household income for the average American family in 2016," sai...

More Than 5 Million U.S. Cancer Survivors Deal With Chronic Pain

One-third of U.S. cancer survivors have chronic pain, and 1 in 6 have levels that restrict their daily activities, a new study finds.

"The prevalence of chronic pain and high impact chronic pain among cancer survivors in our study was almost double that in the general population, suggesting there are important unmet needs in the large and growing community of people with a history of ...

ACA's Medicaid Expansion May Have Lowered Heart Disease Deaths

New research supports the notion that Obamacare has improved the health of Americans: State expansions in Medicaid appear to have cut the number of deaths from heart disease.

Counties in states with expanded Medicaid experienced an average of four fewer deaths from heart disease per 100,000 people than states that didn't accept the expansion under the Affordable Care Act.

In...

'Secret Shopper' Study Finds Many Who Need Addiction Treatment Can't Get It

When people who are addicted to opioids make the difficult decision to quit, the last thing they need to face are barriers to treatment.

Yet, a new "secret shopper" study suggests most addicts seeking a prescription for buprenorphine -- which helps people stop using opioids -- would have trouble even getting an appointment with a doctor qualified to dispense the drug.

When r...

Colon Cancer Screenings Increase When Medicaid Arrives

There were greater increases in colon cancer screening rates in states that expanded Medicaid than in those that did not, a new study finds.

It also found that expansion resulted in hundreds of thousands more people getting screened for colon cancer through colonoscopy, stool testing or sigmoidoscopy.

"Health insurance is a strong predictor of cancer screening, and the unins...

Rising Rx Drug Costs Continue to Create Tough Choices for Seniors

A solid minority of senior citizens still struggles to afford their prescription medications, a new government report shows.

About 5% of adults 65 and older don't take their medication as prescribed to cut costs, according to survey data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And nearly 1 in 5 seniors has asked a doctor to switch them to a cheaper medi...

Medicaid Could Save $2.6 Billion a Year With Dip in Smoking

Just a 1% decrease in the number of Medicaid recipients who smoke could save the insurance program billions of dollars a year, a new study suggests.

Over one year, that small decline in smoking and its associated health harms would lead to $2.6 billion in total Medicaid savings the following year and millions for each state, researchers found.

"While 14% of all adult...

C-Section Infection Risk Higher for Moms on Medicaid: Study

For women who deliver a baby by cesarean section, the risk of developing a surgical site infection is higher if she is covered by Medicaid versus private insurance, a new study finds.

Several factors may be at play, including a patient's living situation and social support after leaving the hospital, as well as differences in the type of care covered by insurers, according to the rese...

Obamacare Is Helping West Virginia Fight the Opioid Crisis

New research suggests that the Medicaid expansion the Affordable Care Act set into motion has played a key role in fighting America's opioid epidemic.

Ever since West Virginia expanded its Medicaid program under "Obamacare," many more people with opioid addiction have been getting treatment, the new study shows.

Experts said the findings -- from a state that is at the center...

Medicaid Coverage for Lung Cancer Screening All Over the Map

State Medicaid programs must do more to make sure that people at high risk for lung cancer are screened for the deadly disease, a new American Lung Association report says.

Medicaid is the public assistance program offering health care coverage for low-income Americans. Medicaid coverage for screening high-risk people varies widely between states: 31 Medicaid fee-for-service programs ...

Insurers Making It Harder to Treat Opioid Addiction: Study

Insurance rules that limit access to the addiction treatment medication buprenorphine may be worsening the U.S. opioid epidemic, a new study suggests.

"Buprenorphine is a safe and effective treatment that decreases deaths due to opioids and stops heroin and other opioid use. People on buprenorphine are able to get their lives back together," said study co-author Dr. Todd Korthuis. He'...

Hearing Aid Upkeep Often Out of Reach for the Poor

If you're poor, you'll likely have less success with your hearing aid, a new study finds.

A survey of more than 1,100 Medicare recipients with hearing aids found that 27 percent of low-income users still had a lot of trouble hearing. That compared with just 11 percent of the wealthiest users.

The reason, the study authors suggested, is that poorer seniors have insufficient a...

Penalties for Higher Hospital Readmission Rates May Hurt Patients

Financial penalties meant to reduce U.S. hospital readmissions for patients with heart failure and pneumonia may actually increase their risk of death after leaving the hospital, a new study suggests.

In 2012, the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services started hitting hospitals with financial penalties for higher-than-expected 30-day readmission rates for patients initially...

Hospitalizations Rising Among the Homeless

On any given night in America, more than 550,000 people are homeless, and they are being hospitalized in greater numbers, a new study suggests.

Despite expanded Medicaid and increased funds for health care clinics, hospitalizations among this vulnerable population are rising, said lead researcher Dr. Rishi Wadhera. He is with the Smith Center for Outcomes Research at Beth Israel Deac...

Obamacare Helped More Women Access Care Before Pregnancy: Study

Ever since the Affordable Care Act expanded Medicaid in some states, more women have received health care before pregnancy, a new study finds.

The number of women who had Medicaid in the month before pregnancy rose from 31 percent to 36 percent in states that opted out of Medicaid expansion, but increased from 43 percent to 57 percent in states that expanded Medicaid, the researchers ...

Fewer Late-Stage Kidney Deaths After Obamacare: Study

End-stage kidney disease patients on dialysis are among those benefiting from Obamacare's expansion of Medicaid, with related deaths declining in states that increased the program's enrollment, research suggests.

Researchers followed more than 230,000 non-elderly kidney failure patients undergoing dialysis treatment in the United States between 2011 and 2017.

Under the Affor...

Don't Blame Obamacare for the Opioid Crisis: Study

A look at past expansions to Medicaid appears to challenge claims that expansion under Obamacare helped fuel the current opioid crisis in the United States.

University of Pennsylvania researchers report that Medicaid expansions actually had the opposite effect, and led to reductions in drug overdose deaths.

"These findings suggest that Medicaid expansions were unlikely to ha...

'Deaths of Despair' May Have Helped Fuel Trump's Victory: Study

U.S. voters' despair over poor health and premature deaths might have tipped the 2016 presidential election in Donald Trump's favor, a new analysis argues.

Counties that voted Republican more heavily had a 15 percent higher age-adjusted death rate than counties that voted heavily Democratic, researchers found.

In particular, counties that shifted toward Trump had much larger...

Obamacare May Have Boosted Access to Birth Control

Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare, may close a big gap in women's access to reproductive health care, a new study suggests.

In a survey of nearly 1,200 women of childbearing age enrolled in Michigan's expansion of Medicaid for low-income adults, one in three said the expanded coverage improved her access to birth control and family planning serv...

Obamacare Enrollee Numbers Aren't Falling: Report

Health insurance coverage rates have held steady in the United States, despite continued commotion over the future of the Affordable Care Act, a new government report shows.

About 28.3 million Americans were uninsured during the first quarter of 2018 -- not significantly different than 2017, and 20.3 million fewer than in 2010, before the health insurance reform law (often called Obam...

More Opioid Users Getting Treatment Since Medicaid Expansion

The expansion of Medicaid that came along with the Affordable Care Act has made it easier for some opioid users to get treatment, new research suggests.

In a study of nearly 12 million Medicaid patients, researchers found that while the number of prescriptions for opioid painkillers decreased slightly, prescriptions for buprenorphine (Buprenex), a drug to treat addiction, and naloxon...

Access to Diabetes Drugs Improved Under Affordable Care Act: Study

People with diabetes face a host of expenses related to their disease, but some relief may now be available in states that expanded Medicaid eligibility as part of the Affordable Care Act.

A new study reports that the number of prescriptions filled rose by up to 40 percent for insulin and other diabetes medications in states that expanded Medicaid eligibility in 2014 and 2015.

...

Wait Times for Obesity Surgery Are Growing

People who want to have weight-loss surgery are facing much longer wait times now than a decade ago, a new study finds.

Among weight-loss surgery patients in Michigan, the typical wait time almost doubled between 2006 and 2016 -- from 86 days, to 159 days, researchers reported.

Delays were especially common for patients on Medicaid, the government health insurance program fo...

To Boost Colon Cancer Screening, Use the Mail

Colon cancer is treatable if caught early. And sending screening tests in the mail might boost timely detection, a new study suggests.

University of North Carolina (UNC) researchers found that Medicaid patients were more likely to get screened if they received stool-testing kits by mail instead of just reminders.

"There has been a national push to increase colorectal cancer ...