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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Misc.".

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Health News Results - 899

Long-Haul COVID Symptoms Common, Rise With Severity of Illness

For people who've suffered through a bout of COVID-19, their misery is too often not over. New research shows that a wide variety of "long-haul" symptoms are common, and the risk rises along with the severity of their case of COVID-19.

In what may be the largest such study to date, "the findings show that beyond the first 30 days of illness, substantial burden of health loss — spanning...

You Don't Have to Be Obese for Belly Fat to Harm You, Heart Experts Warn

THURSDAY, April 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Extra padding around the belly can spell trouble for the heart, even if you're not technically overweight.

That's among the conclusions of a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA), where experts lay out the heart risks of being "apple-shaped."

It encourages doctors to dust off those old-fashi...

'Disrupted' Sleep Could Be Seriously Affecting Your Health

THURSDAY, April 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Waking up briefly throughout the night may do more than leave you feeling grumpy and tired in the morning.

Disrupted sleep may actually increase your odds of dying early from heart disease or any other cause, and women seem to be harder hit by these effects than men.

"The data underscores all the more reasons why we nee...

Chocolate, Butter, Sodas: Avoid These Foods for a Healthier Middle Age

THURSDAY, April 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- It's no secret that too much sugar and saturated fat aren't good for you, but what food combos put you at greater risk for heart disease and death in middle age?

The answer, from a new University of Oxford study, is likely to disappoint a lot of folks.

Researchers found that diets heavy in chocolate and pastries, butter...

Two Is Not Better Than One When It Comes to Blood Thinners

It may not be a good idea to take a daily low-dose aspirin if you're also taking a widely used class of blood thinners called direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), researchers caution.

DOACs include drugs such as Eliquis (apixaban), Pradaxa (dabigatran), Lixiana (edoxaban) and Xarelto (rivaroxaban). They're used to help prevent strokes from atrial fibrillation or for the treatment of what's...

AHA News: Cancer May Cause Changes to the Heart Before Treatment

Some types of cancer may alter the appearance and function of the heart, according to new research that analyzed people's hearts before cancer treatment.

An estimated 1.9 million people in the United States are expected to be diagnosed with cancer this year, according to the National Cancer Institute. Having a history of cancer is linked to a greater risk of cardiovascular problems: Older...

Brain Injuries Raise Long-Term Risk of Stroke

People who suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) have a significantly higher risk for stroke for years afterward, U.K. researchers say.

Previous studies have linked brain injury with a long-term risk of neurological diseases including dementia, Parkinson's and epilepsy, and it's been suggested that it's also an independent risk factor for stroke.

This new review of 18 studies from f...

AHA News: After Two Heart Valve Surgeries, a Mental Toll

After Ivan Hernandez was born with a defective mitral valve, doctors warned his parents he could face heart failure at any age.

Yet Hernandez grew up without incident. He played all sorts of sports, cultivating a love for fitness. As an adult, he sometimes exercised twice a day. He regularly participated in high-intensity interval training and other extreme workouts.

He thought less...

AHA News: Pandemic-Fueled Drug Abuse Threatens Hearts, Lives

On a recent day in his Denver Health emergency room, Dr. Eric Lavonas hit another tragic trifecta.

"In a nine-hour shift, I took care of somebody with chest pain from cocaine, somebody with an opioid overdose who quit breathing, and somebody with methamphetamine use who thought he was being chased by shape-shifting demons," he said. "Sadly, that is not a rare occurrence anymore."

La...

Too Much Red Meat Might Harm Your Heart

TUESDAY, April 20, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- If you've ever scoffed at warnings that too much red or processed meat is bad for the heart while oily fish is good for you, there's now some visual evidence to support that advice.

British researchers used heart imaging to see how these foods affected volunteers' heart health.

The images revealed that those who ate more...

Hormone Treatments May Raise Blood Pressure in Transgender People

Monitoring blood pressure is important for transgender people, according to new research, which found changes in systolic blood pressure after the start of gender-affirming hormone therapy.

Transgender men and transgender women have a higher burden of heart attack, stroke and related conditions, the study noted.

Gender-affirming hormone therapy isn't new. Doctors have prescribed the...

AHA News: Could the Pandemic Help Boost Diversity in Clinical Trials?

The pandemic has exposed troubling inequities in the United States that have left Black and Hispanic people at higher risk of dying from COVID-19 – and getting a smaller share of vaccines.

Now, a renewed focus on health inequities has sparked hope among health advocates for a structural change that has been a long time coming: more diversity in clinical trials.

Back in 1994, the N...

AHA News: While Mopping, Young Mom's Heart Tore

On a Saturday morning last August, Sindi Mafu had started her typical weekly chores – dusting, laundry, sweeping. Her 4-year-old daughter, Avela, was busy with her Zoom ballet class, and her toddler, Lunga, was eating his breakfast. Sindi grabbed her mop.

She started sweating – profusely. Too much for merely mopping. She checked to make sure the air conditioner was on (it was), began ...

1 in 50 COVID Patients in ICU Will Develop a Stroke

FRIDAY, April 16, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Among COVID-19 patients in intensive care units (ICUs), 2% suffer a stroke, a new study finds.

Of the two types of stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, which is caused by bleeding in the brain, was linked to a higher risk of death than ischemic stroke, which is caused by a blood clot in the brain. Data on just under 2,700 patients was u...

AHA News: The Link Between Structural Racism, High Blood Pressure and Black People's Health

High blood pressure. Structural racism.

What do they have in common?

Researchers say they are two of the biggest factors responsible for the gap in poor heart and brain health between Black and white adults in the United States. And they are inextricably linked.

Studies show high blood pressure, also called hypertension, affects Black adults – particularly women – earlier ...

AHA News: Waist Size May Better Predict AFib Risk in Men

Body mass index may be more helpful in predicting the risk of a common type of irregular heartbeat in women, while waist size may better predict that risk in men, new research suggests.

The link between obesity and atrial fibrillation, or AFib – when the heart beats irregularly and often too fast – is well established. But researchers wanted to understand the extent to which body fat ...

AHA News: 5 Things to Know This Earth Day About How the Environment Affects Health

Earth Day on April 22 puts a spotlight on the planet's health which, doctors say, is closely tied to your own.

Here are five things to know about the connection.

Pollution is not a small, faraway health issue

"The footprint of pollution globally is massive," and air pollution is the biggest danger, said Dr. Sanjay Rajagopalan, chief of cardiovascular medicine ...

AHA News: Straight Answers to Common Questions About COVID-19 Vaccines

If you've got questions about COVID-19 vaccines, you're not the only one. Even as many people rush to get their shots, surveys show others just aren't sure about them.

Dr. Won Lee, medical director of Boston Medical Center's Home Care Program, understands. "There's so much misinformation out there," she said. "And it's hard for anyone to know what to believe."

Lee is part of a medic...

Physically Active at Work? It's Not as Healthy as Leisure Exercise

Going for a brisk walk after a long day at work may be better for your heart than getting all of your exercise on the job.

New research suggests that while current health guidelines indicate that leisure-time activity and physical activity at work are created equally when it comes to heart health benefits, this may not be the case after all.

Leisure-time exercise -- whether it be ta...

AHA News: Instructed in CPR By 911 Dispatcher, Nebraska Couple Saves 13-Day-Old Son

During a nightly TV newscast in January, anchor Bill Schammert's voice broke as he described why he'd been off the air for a few days.

It started when his 13-day-old son, Cameron, came down with a case of the sniffles. Just to be on the safe side, the pediatrician suggested bringing him in for a checkup.

They never made it there. After strapping Cameron into his car seat, Bill notic...

AHA News: Not Just Bad Shoes and Sore Muscles – She Had Peripheral Artery Disease

Abigail Dudek celebrated her 40th birthday in Las Vegas a few months ago, grateful to go hiking and cycling without pain for the first time in more than two years.

The problem started in April 2018. As her county's 911 public educator, she spent most the day on her feet at a public event. Although she was accustomed to achy feet, this time it felt different.

"It was like a hard pea ...

AHA News: Flu May Play Part in Plaque-Rupturing Heart Attacks

Getting a flu vaccine can reduce the risk of a common type of heart attack in people 60 and older, according to new research that suggests the virus plays a role in rupturing plaque.

In a study published Thursday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, researchers in Spain used data from five consecutive flu seasons and zeroed in on 8,240 people who had Type 1 heart attacks. The...

AHA News: Boosters Hope Bicycling Boom Outlasts the Pandemic

It doesn't seem right to put "silver lining" and "pandemic" in the same sentence. But the past year of COVID-19 has been a boon for bicycling, an indisputably healthy activity.

"Bikes have been one of those bright spots, as we've been getting through this last year," Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg told the National Bike Summit in early March. "People have been rediscovering ho...

AHA News: Want to Help Fight for Health Justice? It May Be Time to Listen

A pandemic, protests and politics have highlighted the nation's long-standing, deep-seated racial issues and how they affect the health of millions of Americans. People who've never confronted racism before are asking, "How can I show I'm an ally?"

For the uninitiated, being a partner in the fight against racism can begin by looking inward. First and foremost, "it's about listening, parti...

AHA News: Physical Therapy Visit for Knee Injury Was First Step Toward His Quadruple Bypass

James "Pete" Watt walked into a physical therapy appointment in April 2018 feeling unusually lightheaded and anxious.

"I just felt off," he said.

The therapist took his blood pressure reading. It was dangerously high -- 200/100.

"You're not going anywhere until someone comes to get you," she told him.

Pete, who lives in Lake Stevens, Washington, called his wife, Lisa. Sh...

Some Blood Pressure Meds Raise Heart Risks in People With HIV

Beta-blocker blood pressure medications may increase the risk of heart problems in people with HIV, new research suggests.

For the study, the researchers reviewed the medical records of more than 8,000 U.S. veterans with HIV who developed high blood pressure between 2000 and 2018. Of those, around 6,500 had never been diagnosed with heart or blood vessel problems.

At the start...

AHA News: For Heart Patients, Bariatric Surgery May Lower Risk of Future Cardiovascular Problems

Bariatric surgery can be a difficult decision for treating obesity, as patients and their doctors weigh the risks and side effects of the procedure against the benefits of the weight loss that usually follows.

Heart disease adds another factor to the risk-benefit analysis. Is the surgery a good idea for people who already have cardiovascular problems?

New research published Monday i...

AHA News: Refined Flour Substitutes Abound -- But How to Choose the Best One?

A trip down a grocery store's baking goods aisle can leave you in a daze these days if you're thinking about replacing white or all-purpose flour with one of the many alternatives on shelves.

In recent years, the pantry staple used for baking and making pasta has become a dietary public enemy, giving way to healthier nut and seed flours, such as almond, chickpea and even banana.

But...

Heart Disease Gaining on Cancer as Leading Cause of Death in Young Women

Heart disease is gaining on cancer as the leading cause of death among American women under 65.

"Young women in the United States are becoming less healthy, which is now reversing prior improvements seen in heart disease deaths for the gender," said Dr. Erin Michos, associate professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. She's the co-author of a new study that inv...

Many Recovering COVID Patients Show Signs of Long-Term Organ Damage

Long-term organ damage appears to be common in hospitalized COVID-19 patients after they've recovered and been discharged, British researchers report.

One U.S. expert who read over the report said she's seen the same in her practice.

"This study proves that the damage done is not just to the lungs, but can affect the heart, the brain and the kidneys, as well," said Dr. Mangala Naras...

AHA News: Why You Should Pay Attention to Inflammation

Inflammation can be a visible part of how your body fights illness or injury. If you've ever sprained your ankle, you already know about it.

But it also can be much less obvious, and researchers are still unraveling its mysteries. Some of what they've learned has intriguing potential for treating heart disease and other illnesses.

"Inflammation is a complex reaction triggered by you...

AHA News: Unloading Groceries, He Found His Wife on the Ground Not Breathing

Lynn and Kent Wiles spent the morning running errands together. The Oregon couple shopped for groceries, stopped by the bank and picked up items at the hardware store.

Once home, they were bringing in bags from the car. Lynn had stayed in the kitchen to put away a couple perishables while Kent went to get the last few bags. With everything in place, she headed back out through the dining ...

AHA News: The Secret to Good Health Is No Secret. So Why Is It So Hard to Achieve?

It ought to be a no-brainer, so to speak: Research has pinpointed seven ways people can achieve ideal heart and brain health. And -- bonus -- if Americans did those things, they also could help prevent many other chronic illnesses.

But most people don't, at least not consistently. What's stopping them?

"Most of these steps require a great deal of self-regulation and self-control," s...

Healthy Living in Middle Age Really Pays Off in Senior Years

Live well, live longer.

New research offers more evidence that the mantra rings true: People who got regular exercise and ate a healthy diet in middle age had a reduced risk of serious health problems as seniors.

"Health care professionals could use these findings to further promote and emphasize to their patients the benefits of a healthy diet and a regular exercise schedule t...

Black Adults Face 4 Times the Odds for Stroke as Whites

Once Black Americans reach age 40, their blood pressure often begins a rapid climb, putting them at significantly higher risk of stroke than their white counterparts, a new study warns.

Middle-aged Black people have roughly four times the stroke risk faced by white Americans, according to the analysis of data from nearly 5,100 patients.

"High blood pressure is the single most import...

AHA News: When Her Heart Stopped After Her Dog Died, Doctors Said It Was Broken Heart Syndrome

Tess and Dan Kossow did all they could to have a child.

When they turned to in vitro fertilization, their first attempt appeared to work. But then Tess had a miscarriage.

"It was early in the pregnancy," she said, "but devastating nevertheless."

While Dan shared her grief, she had another source of support: Mr. Big, their ironically named 7-pound Maltese. Tess loved playing mo...

AHA News: Black Young Adults Face Higher Stroke Risk Than Their White Peers

Black young adults are almost four times more likely than their white counterparts to have a stroke, according to new research. Yet regardless of race, the risk of having a stroke at a younger age increased as blood pressure rose.

High blood pressure is the leading cause of stroke. It adds to the heart's workload and over time damages arteries and organs. Experts already knew stroke rates...

Astronauts Will Need Tough Workouts on Any Mission to Mars

As NASA astronauts set their sights on reaching Mars and building an outpost on the moon, they are likely to need regular, rigorous exercise to keep their hearts in shape, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data gathered from U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly during his year in space from 2015 to 2016 and from Benoît Lecomte's attempt to swim across the Pacific Ocean in 2018. Investigat...

Smoking Rates High Among Surgery Patients

U.S. surgery patients have a high rate of smoking, which could be one reason why some wind up on the operating table, researchers say.

A look at nearly 329,000 Michigan residents who had common surgical procedures between 2012 and 2019 found that nearly a quarter had smoked in the past year. In comparison, just over 14% of U.S. adults smoked in 2019.

The highest rates of smoking wer...

AHA News: Heart Failure at 35 Helped New York Cardiologist Better Care for Patients

Unlike most of his cardiology colleagues, Dr. Satjit "Saj" Bhusri has personal experience with heart disease -- and he doesn't hesitate to share his story with patients.

Sometimes, he'll even show them a picture. He's lying in a hospital bed, hooked up to a ventilator and covered in ice to bring down a raging fever -- the result of a viral infection that led to heart failure when he was 3...

AHA News: Up to 2 Million Cardiovascular 'Events' Could Be Averted Each Year by Doing This

About 2 million cases of heart attack, stroke and heart failure might be prevented each year if U.S. adults had high cardiovascular health as defined by a set of seven metrics, according to a new study.

Even modest improvements in the population's overall heart health could make a significant dent in the number of cardiovascular disease cases.

These Life's Simple 7 metrics, which th...

Gen X, Millennials in Worse Health Than Prior Generations at Same Age

Medicine may have advanced by leaps and bounds over the last century, but Generation X and millennials are in worse health than their parents and grandparents were at their age.

That's the conclusion of a new study that looked at markers of physical and mental health across the generations.

And overall, there has been a downhill slide over time: Gen X'ers and millennials were in wor...

AHA News: 7 Healthy Strategies to Navigate a Food Swamp

On nearly every corner, and along the roads in between, the familiar signs comfort and tempt us: burgers and fried chicken, ice cream and doughnuts, sweets and treats galore.

Welcome to the food swamp, where Americans get bogged down in a morass of cheap, convenient, alluring -- and very often unhealthy -- culinary choices.

"All these fast-food companies with all their marketing are...

AHA News: As Fermented Foods Rise in Popularity, Here's What Experts Say

The increasingly trendy trio of kefir, kimchi and kombucha may not be familiar to you, but experts say fermented foods like these can help the home of most of your immune system -- your gut.

How and why some (not all) fermented foods work is an unraveling mystery that goes back to hunter-gatherer humans. Today, nutrition scientists say to look beyond "probiotic" and "prebiotic" labels to ...

AHA News: Stroke, Blindness, a Heart Transplant -- And a Can-Do Spirit

Hana Hooper went to college with dreams of becoming a veterinarian. She aspired to boost her knowledge of biology and intended to amplify her interest in art.

She was 18, and her future was aflame with potential.

"We thought she'd go and have a normal college experience," said her mother, Ali.

Five years later, Hana has shown moxie in circumstances that have been anything but ...

Could Viagra Help Men With Heart Disease Live Longer?

Those little blue pills were designed to help men experiencing impotence. But Viagra and drugs like it might also lower the risk of dying or experiencing a new heart attack in men with heart disease, according to new Swedish research.

"Potency problems are common in older men and now our study also shows that PDE5 inhibitors may protect against heart attack and prolong life," said study ...

Ultra-Processed Foods Are Ultra-Bad for Your Heart

More than half of the food Americans eat is "ultra-processed" -- and it's making them sick.

Higher consumption of these highly processed foods is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death, according to a new study, and yet they account for 58% of calories in a U.S. diet. Each additional serving increased the risk.

You might not even realize that a food yo...

Cancer Survivors May Face Higher Odds for Heart Trouble

Cancer survivors, especially older ones, have an increased risk of heart disease over the next decade, a new study finds.

Ohio State University researchers analyzed data from more than 15,000 U.S. adults, aged 40 to 79, who were followed from 2007 to 2016. At the start of the study period, 13% reported a history of cancer but none had a history of heart disease.

Over the next decade...

AHA News: Blood Pressure Successes in Black People May Come Down to These 2 Things

A study of Black Americans who kept their blood pressure healthy as they aged could help pinpoint the best ways to prevent hypertension before it starts.

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a widespread problem among Black people in the U.S., said Shakia Hardy, assistant professor of epidemiology in the School of Public Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. More than hal...

Can Fitbits Be a Dieter's Best Friend?

Looking to shed some of those pandemic pounds? A new analysis says wearables like Fitbit and Apple Watch can help people slim down.

The researchers examined studies involving commercial health wearables and adults who were overweight/obese or had a chronic health condition.

After daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for a period between a month and a year, participants lost ...

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