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Results for search "Alcohol: Misc.".

Health News Results - 88

Junk Food, Booze Often Star in America's Hit Movies


If there was an Oscar for "most unhealthy food in a leading role," many of America's most popular movies would be serious contenders.

That's the conclusion of a new review of food content featured in 250 top-grossing U.S. movies. More often than not, the fictional food choices were so bad they wouldn't make the cut of real-world dietary recommendations, the ...

Nurses Can Make the Difference for New Moms' Breastfeeding

One key to breastfeeding success? Having enough hospital nurses to ensure that new moms get top-notch care.

Hospitals with higher rates of exclusive breastfeeding had nurses who provided more consistent care, according to a new report.

That care included helping moms have skin-to-skin contact with their babies and breastfeed within an hour of giving birth. Nurses also provi...

More Young Adults in the U.S. Are Saying No to Alcohol

In a sign that many young Americans may no longer be boozing it up, a new study finds that fewer young people are drinking alcohol now than 20 years ago.

In fact, the number of men and women in the United States between the ages of 18 to 22 who abstained from drinking increased from 20% to 28% for college students and from 24% to 30% for those not in school, the resea...

Reduced Drinking May Improve Veterans' Chronic Pain

Cutting back on booze may reduce chronic pain and use of other substances among U.S. veterans who are heavy drinkers, according to a new report.

The study included about 1,500 veterans who completed annual surveys between 2003 and 2015, and reported heavy drinking in at least one of those surveys.

"We found some evidence for improvement of pain interference symptoms and subs...

What Foods, Medicines Can Lower Your Colon Cancer Risk?

Certain nutrients, foods and medicines may help protect you against colon cancer, a large research review suggests.

A team of international researchers led by Dr. Marc Bardou, of Dijon Bourgogne University Hospital in France, reviewed about 80 studies that examined how diet and certain medicines affected colon cancer risk. The studies were published between September 1980 and June 201...

Pandemic Has More Americans Turning to Booze

Is the coronavirus pandemic driving people to drink?

Yes, a new U.S. survey shows, and the greatest spike in alcohol use is being seen in women.

Overall, there was a 14% jump in drinking frequency this past spring among U.S. adults over 30 when compared to last year at the same time, researchers found. Among women, drinking frequency went up 17%.

But excess...

More Than 1 Drink a Day Ups Blood Pressure for Diabetics

It's probably a good idea to skip that second glass of wine if you have diabetes, because new research suggests that having more than one drink daily raises your risk of high blood pressure.

People with type 2 diabetes who had eight or more drinks a week (moderate drinkers) had more than 60% higher odds of having high blood pressure, according to the study. They also tended to ha...

Each Day Sober Slowly Helps Alcoholics' Brains Recover

A new brain scan study shows why the "one day at a time" approach works for recovering alcoholics.

"For people with AUD [alcohol use disorder], the brain takes a long time to normalize, and each day is going to be a struggle," explained senior study author Rajita Sinha, a professor of psychiatry and neuroscience at Yale University's Child Study Center. "For these people, it really is ...

Booze, Drug Use Common at Virtual Parties During Pandemic

Drug use is common among people taking part in virtual raves and happy hours during the coronavirus pandemic, a new study finds.

"We explored whether stay-at-home orders changed how people use drugs -- and it appears that drug use during virtual gatherings is somewhat prevalent among the party-going population we studied," said study author Joseph Palamar. He's associate professor of ...

His Body Brewed Its Own Alcohol, But a Fecal Transplant Shut the Brewery Down

In a first, doctors have used a fecal transplant to treat a rare condition that causes the body to brew its own alcohol.

The disorder, known as auto-brewery syndrome (ABS), occurs when yeast builds up in the gut and converts sugar from food into alcohol. The result is a lot like being drunk: Blood alcohol spikes, causing symptoms such as dizziness, disorientation, coordination problem...

Less Smoking, Drinking Means Fewer Hip Fractures for Americans

In a rare bit of good health news for Americans, a new government study finds that hip fracture rates have fallen substantially since the 1970s.

Between 1970 and 2010, broken hips dropped by two-thirds among Americans in a decades-long health study. The likely reason? Researchers say drops in both smoking and heavy drinking played a significant role.

The improvement was true...

Alcohol and Arrhythmia a Deadly Mix

Alcohol abuse is associated with an increased the risk of death in people with abnormal heart rhythms, a new study warns.

Researchers reviewed deaths among almost 115,000 patients aged 15-54 hospitalized for abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia) between 2010 and 2014.

Nearly 10% of the patients were also diagnosed with alcohol abuse, defined as drinking that causes problems...

Dangerous 'Drunkorexia' Hits College Campuses

College students are known to drink too much and eat a poor diet.

So it may not be surprising that new research has revealed that these two unhealthy behaviors often collide on campus.

When students diet, exercise or purge to purposely offset calories they consume from alcohol, experts sometimes call this "drunkorexia."

The new study, published online recently in ...

A Drink or Two a Day Might Be Good for Your Brain: Study

Love a glass of wine with dinner? There's good news for you from a study that finds "moderate" alcohol consumption -- a glass or two per day -- might actually preserve your memory and thinking skills.

This held true for both men and women, the researchers said.

There was one caveat, however: The study of nearly 20,000 Americans tracked for an average of nine years found tha...

What Behaviors Will Shorten Your Life?

Smoking, drinking too much and divorce are among the social and behavioral factors most strongly linked to dying early, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 13,600 U.S. adults between 1992 and 2008, and examined 57 social and behavioral factors among those who died between 2008 and 2014.

The 10 factors most closely linked with dying were: being a curren...

AHA News: Blood Test That Measures Alcohol Use May Predict Risk for Bleeding Strokes

People who drink large amounts of alcohol have nearly fivefold odds of experiencing a potentially deadly type of stroke compared with those who drink very little or not at all, a new study finds.

But researchers didn't rely on people to self-report how much alcohol they consumed. Rather, they looked at blood concentrations of phosphatidylethanol (PEth), a biomarker reflecting alcohol co...

Older Gays, Lesbians at Higher Odds for Drug, Alcohol Abuse: Study

Alcohol and drug use is more common among older adults who identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual than among their straight counterparts, a new study finds.

For the study, New York University (NYU) researchers analyzed 25,880 responses from adults aged 50 and older who participated in a nationwide survey on alcohol and drug use between 2015 and 2017. Of the participants, 2.5% identi...

Scientists Spot More Genes Linked to Problem Drinking

It was already known that genetics can play a role in drinking problems, but now researchers have identified additional gene variants that could help identify many more at-risk people.

The team conducted a genome-wide analysis of more than 435,000 people of European ancestry to look for shared gene variants among people with problem drinking.

The researchers pinpointed 19 ne...

Turning to Wine During Lockdown? Here's How to Protect Your Teeth

Weathering the coronavirus pandemic might include imbibing a few glasses of red wine on occasion, but one expert says you don't have to wind up with stained teeth because of it.

"The strength of your enamel and how prone you are to plaque buildup is key to how much your teeth might stain," said Dr. Uchenna Akosa, head of Rutgers Health University Dental Associates, the faculty practic...

To Cut Down on Boozing, Offer Other Choices: Study

There's a simple way to limit your guests' boozing: Give them plenty of alternatives.

A British study finds that people are more likely to choose alcohol-free options if they outnumber boozy choices.

There were more than 800 people in the study. When presented with eight drink choices in an online questionnaire, participants were 48% more likely to choose a nonalcoholic...

Heavy Drinking Tied to Raised Stroke Risk, Study Finds

Lots of boozing might increase your risk for a stroke, Swedish researchers report.

Heavy alcohol use can triple your risk for peripheral artery disease, a narrowing of arteries that results in reduced blood flow, usually to the legs. It can also increase your risk for stroke by 27%. There's also evidence of a link to coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation and aortic aneurys...

When Booze Labels Carry Health Warnings, Drinking Declines: Study

If warning labels on cigarette packs discourage smoking, could warning labels on alcohol products discourage drinking? Researchers in Canada decided to find out.

In the study, which began in 2017, the researchers applied about 300,000 colorful, highly visible warning labels to 98% of alcohol containers in the largest liquor store in the Yukon, which has Canada's highest rate of a...

Have a Hangover? Try This Herbal Remedy

For as long as humans have been drinking alcohol, they have sought a cure for hangovers. Now, a small study suggests that a mix of plant extracts might help ease the misery.

Researchers found that the herbal blend -- of Barbados cherry, prickly pear, ginkgo biloba, willow and ginger root extracts -- seemed to lessen certain hangover symptoms.

The supplement also contained va...

Heavy Drinking Into Old Age Ups Health Risks: Study

Long-term heavy drinking may lead to significant weight gain and an increased risk of heart disease and stroke in older adults, British researchers warn.

They analyzed data from more than 4,800 U.K. civil servants who were 34 to 56 years old when the study began in the mid-1980s. Three-quarters were men.

Heavy drinking -- defined as three or four drinks, four or more times a...

Living Healthier Can Help Shield You From A-fib: AHA

From weight loss to physical activity, lifestyle changes are effective, yet underused strategies to manage atrial fibrillation, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA).

Atrial fibrillation -- also known as a-fib or AF -- is an abnormal heart rhythm affecting more than 2.7 million Americans.

In a-fib, the heart's upper chambers beat ...

AA Still Best to Beat Problem Drinking, Review Finds

For people who want to stop drinking, the world's oldest alcohol support group is still the best way, a new review concludes.

In an analysis of 27 studies, researchers found that Alcoholics Anonymous was typically more effective than behavioral therapies when it came to helping people remain abstinent. AA also appeared as good as those therapies in reducing excessive drinking, and the...

Drinking Takes Toll on Bones of People With HIV: Study

Any amount of alcohol consumption increases the risk of osteoporosis in people with HIV, a new report suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from a long-term study of 198 people with HIV and a current or past alcohol or drug use disorder.

In these people, any alcohol consumption was associated with lower levels of a protein involved in bone formation, putting them at increased ...

U.S. Kids Waiting a Little Longer to Try Alcohol, Drugs

It's never good news that kids are using drugs and alcohol, but fewer U.S. teens are starting before their 16th birthday, a new study finds.

Researchers found that between 2004 and 2017, the age at which teens started drinking alcohol and smoking rose from 16 to 17 years. The age for trying heroin went from 17 to 18, and for cocaine it increased from 18 to 19 years. For crack cocaine...

They Thought She Drank, But Her Body Actually 'Auto-Brewed'

Doctors thought they had a fairly common scenario in front of them: A patient with advanced liver disease who needed help for her alcohol abuse. Then they discovered her own bladder was making the alcohol.

The doctors, at the University of Pittsburgh, say it's a previously unrecognized variant of so-called auto-brewery syndrome. ABS, which has been reported sporadically over the years...

Alcohol-Linked Deaths Soaring in U.S., Women Hit Hardest

Americans are drinking themselves to death at ever-increasing rates, with women in particular hitting the bottle hard, a new study shows.

The rate of alcohol-induced deaths among women increased between 3.1% and 3.6% a year from 2000 to 2016, while deaths among men increased 1.4% to 1.8% each year, according to the findings.

What's worse, the rates have accel...

As Liquor Stores Close, Murder Rates Decline

Having fewer liquor stores in cities may lead to lower murder rates, a new study suggests.

The implication of alcohol zoning regulations can have life-or-death consequences -- at least in Baltimore, according to study author Pamela Trangenstein, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues.

"There is an ongoing violence epidemic in Baltimore, with recen...

Do Young Adults Really 'Age Out' of Heavy Drinking?

During the late teens and early 20s, young people may booze it up a lot, but they eventually dial it back, right?

A new study study confirms that drinking rates do tend to decrease after college age. But on an individual level, it all depends on various factors such as the drinker's social networks and personality.

"It's almost become a myth that people mature out of alco...

Pregnant Moms Who Smoke, Drink Put Babies at Risk of SIDS: Study

Pregnant women who smoke cigarettes and drink alcohol may put their babies at higher odds for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), a new government study finds.

After the first trimester of pregnancy, women who both smoked and drank increased the risk for SIDS nearly 12 times. For those who continued to smoke, SIDS risk rose fivefold, and for those who continued to drink, the risk wa...

What Parents Can Do to Prevent Teens From Driving Drunk

Older teens who know that their parents disapprove of drinking are less likely to drive impaired as young adults, a new study finds.

"As kids get older, we tend to step away from them. We think: 'They've got this.' But if kids think we approve or disapprove of them drinking, that can have a powerful effect," said lead author Dr. Federico Vaca, director of the Yale Developmental Neuroc...

More Than Half of Cancer Survivors Don't Abstain From Alcohol

U.S. cancer survivors have surprisingly high rates of alcohol use, researchers say.

"This study highlights the prevalence of current alcohol use among cancer survivors, including an increase in alcohol intake over time and higher rates among younger cancer survivors," said Dr. Crystal Denlinger, chief of GI Medical Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.

"As al...

Alcohol-Fueled Deaths Double in U.S. Over Past 20 Years

The number of Americans dying from alcohol abuse each year has doubled since 1999, a new study reveals.

Between 1999 and 2017, alcohol-related deaths jumped from nearly 36,000 a year to almost 73,000. That's about 1 million deaths lost to booze over less than two decades, with white women experiencing the greatest annual increases.

"Those deaths are associated with despair...

One Way to Help Ease A-Fib: Give Up Drinking

If you have atrial fibrillation (a-fib) -- a potentially dangerous irregular heart rhythm -- giving up alcohol could ease your symptoms.

That's what happened when researchers asked people with a-fib who normally have roughly two drinks a day to stop drinking. When they compared the teetotalers to a similar group of people with a-fib who continued drinking, the investigators found that...

Toast a Healthy New Year With These Holiday Cocktail Recipes

Looking to ring in the New Year with cocktails that are lower in calories? Here are three delicious options worthy of a special celebration any time of the year with a little fruit tossed in for good measure.

For an elegant pink champagne cocktail, to each glass add 4 ounces of dry champagne or Spanish cava and 1 ounce of a raspberry- or rhubarb-flavored liquor like Aperol, a milder a...

Heart Tissue May Be Harmed by Heavy Drinking: Study

Heavy drinking may damage heart tissue, researchers warn.

Previous studies have shown that heavy drinking increases the risk of heart failure, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke and heart rhythm disorders, but there has been little study into why it poses such a risk to heart health.

In this study, researchers analyzed three blood indicators of heart damage in more th...

A New Approach to Stop High-Risk Drunk Drivers

An individualized approach is needed to treat people at high risk of impaired (drunk) driving, a new report says.

Drunk driving accounted for 29% of U.S. motor vehicle deaths in 2018, the lowest percentage since 1982. But there was still an average of one alcohol-impaired driving death every 50 minutes, or 29 deaths a day, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHS...

Tighter Alcohol Laws Might Help Curb Cancer

Policies that reduce drinking may lower rates of alcohol-related cancers, researchers say.

"When thinking about cancer risk and cancer prevention, the focus tends to be on individual-level risk factors rather than environmental determinants of cancer, like public policies that affect the consumption of alcohol or tobacco," said study co-author Dr. Timothy Naimi.

Naimi is a p...

Women Lead Upswing in U.S. Binge Drinking

Binge drinking is on the rise among Americans, especially among women, with rates doubling among childless females in their early 30s, a new study finds.

"Mommy drinking" is also up, say researchers.

"Although heavy drinking has either decreased or stabilized for most groups, binge drinking is still common and is becoming even more prevalent," said lead author Sarah McKett...

Most Americans Fear Cancer, but Feel Powerless to Prevent It: Survey

While 6 in 10 Americans say they're concerned about developing cancer, only 1 in 4 make cancer prevention part of their daily lives, a new online survey reveals.

Roughly a quarter think there's nothing they can do to prevent it. But the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) says as many of half of cancer cases are preventable.

"Tobacco use, diet, sun exposure, alcohol...

What Kind of Drinking Can Trigger A-Fib?

Frequent drinking is more likely than binge drinking to increase your risk of the most common heart rhythm disorder, a new study finds.

Atrial fibrillation (a-fib) increases the risk of stroke by fivefold. Symptoms include racing or irregular pulse, palpitations, shortness of breath, tiredness, chest pain and dizziness.

For the new study, researchers analyzed data from 9.7 ...

Aging Population, Unhealthy Habits Underlie Expected Cancer Surge

Due to population growth and aging, the number of cancer cases worldwide is expected to jump 60% by 2040 -- but unhealthy lifestyle habits are likely to make the surge even larger.

That's the conclusion from the new edition of the Cancer Atlas, unveiled Wednesday at the World Cancer Leaders' Summit in Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan. It notes that unhealthy habits such as smoking, p...

Trying to Conceive? Both Dad and Mom Should Give Up Drinking in Months Before

Women have long been told to cut out drinking if they are pregnant or think they might become pregnant.

But a new study suggests that men hoping to become fathers should also stay away from alcohol for at least six months before trying to conceive.

If would-be moms and dads drink in the three months before pregnancy, and if mom drinks during the first trimester, they run the...

A Drink a Day Might Be Good for Diabetics' Health, Study Suggests

Chinese researchers may deserve a toast for their new findings that suggest light to moderate drinking may be beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes.

The review found that people who had a bit of alcohol daily had lower levels of a type of blood fat called triglycerides. But alcohol didn't seem to lower blood sugar levels in people who already had type 2 diabetes, the review found...

Booze Taxes Don't Make Up for Societal Costs of Excess Drinking: Study

Alcohol taxes do little to reduce the burden on American taxpayers for the harmful impacts of heavy drinking, a new study finds.

The cost of harm caused by excessive drinking in the United States is just over $2 per drink, with about 80 cents of that shouldered by government. But state and federal alcohol taxes bring in an average of about 21 cents per drink.

That means mos...

E-Scooters Plus Drinking: A Fast-Pass to the ER?

Drinking and driving an electric scooter doesn't mix, according to a new study.

Researchers reported serious injuries like brain bleeding or fractures that have happened while riding an electric scooter (e-scooter). Alcohol and drugs were a factor in many of these crashes.

"E-scooters may look like fun and games, but it's a vehicle. It's a motor attached to wheels, and you n...

Could Red Wine Boost Your 'Microbiome'?

A little pinot noir now and then might help keep the bacteria in your tummy healthy and happy, a new study suggests.

As little as one glass of red wine a week can increase the diversity of the good bacteria in your microbiome, which can help lower bad cholesterol and keep your weight down, researchers say.

"The more people drink, the higher the diversity. But even small amou...

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